Jump to content

Kitchen table question. Sorry. But I am not sorry.


owen
 Share

Recommended Posts

You are all my wood experts. I am aware that this is stretching the purpose of this sub-forum. I need a new kitchen table. I can get some chunky legs here https://www.thehairpinlegcompany.co.uk/products/box-section-trapizum?variant=31350000877702&gclid=CjwKCAjwyo36BRAXEiwA24CwGXc_Oi6fX0Doj4FnZPX1iQHAVqcF3TLxqkvkxr4Nl4fCZKSRfPFCYxoC_FoQAvD_BwE. This means I could get a top made of some nice wood. Not sure what yet. 

In a perfect world I would have a table which would be completely waterproof so that we would not have to faff with mats and stuff. Heatproof would be beyond fabulous but I suspect that is not to be. Is there anything I can put on it which will not make it look like plastic but will protect it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The benches in a lab I once worked in were made of afromosia. It's a tropical hardwood, as far as I can tell was indestructible.  Chemical burns, soldering iron burns, occasional frustrated fists, nothing touched it. When the labs were refurbished we bagged the benches. The stuff was also impossible to saw and denser than a white dwarf. 

Waterproof to me automatically suggests yacht varnish or an exterior grade varnish. They're probably heat proof for typical plates, maybe not boiling jam.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depending on what finish you want I would recommend Danish oil, I’ve used it on hardwood kitchen worktops, it’s really hard wearing and it protects against water, but like most finishes it will mark with something very hot , you can also build up the depth with more coats 🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone. 

I could do Danish Oil. I have actually done a bass in Danish Oil so I know what I am doing. This is unusual for me. 

Utile looks like it could be nice but depending on the plank (like all wood I guess). I have some Sapele (similar apparently) planks for handrails and they are a bit bland. Dunno. But I do appreciate the input though. 

The Epoxy thing looks interesting but for a 6ft table top it looks like a pretty specialist thing to do given the heating needed (according to YT) etc. 

Corian is nice, but it is not wood :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For a kitchen table I would use anti-bacterial worktop oil. It is water resistant but wears off through use eventually so normally needs an annual treatment, or whenever liquids stop beading on the surface. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tables use Osmo Polyx Oil. Get a semi gloss, wipes on and off and it’s perfect. We use it on all tables, restaurants, hard traffic areas when we do full refurbs and designs. Only wipe down with warm soapy water though, no detergents and it’ll be grand. Scandinavians use this stuff on everything wooden, it’s brilliant! Re coat every year or so ( or when the colour lightens up) and it’ll be fine. Danish oil will feed but not protect from stains or heat rings. We used it for Hugh at River Cottage and they cook, bake and eat off the surfaces and it gets mega hammer!

Ive used iroco Science Lab worktops before, they are proper heavy duty. 
 

Hope this helps?

Edited by walshy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Do you want timber only or are you willing to consider other options as well? My table is made of quartz. Its strength is comparable to that of natural stone. It also has scratch resistance. This material doesn`t support combustion and doesn`t deteriorate from temperature changes. It`s easy to care for with any cleaners without fear that the aggressive components will destroy the surface. I`ve had this desk for quite some time now, I bought it from Quartz Worktops Leeds, I don't know if quartz suits your style, but I suggest you take a closer look.

Edited by Mutamycete
forgot to say smth
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Make sure you buy the wood in 8’ lengths. That way when you’ve finished making the table you’ll stand back and say ‘Well would you look at that? I have two pieces of wood left , each the size of a blank for a bass body….’

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Jabba_the_gut said:

Make sure you buy the wood in 8’ lengths. That way when you’ve finished making the table you’ll stand back and say ‘Well would you look at that? I have two pieces of wood left , each the size of a blank for a bass body….’

Have you seen my rate of progress as a luthier.........................

  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...