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Epiphone Jack Casady Signature Bass


Shylock
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Brand:
Epiphone  

Model:
Jack Casady Signature Bass

 So here’s the thing...I only bought this bass in Sept 2019 because the band I was in decided we would do more lower level acoustic type numbers with the guitarist swapping his strat for a semi accounting and the drummer on a cajon.  My  other  main basses are a Gibbo T Bird, Fender US P and US J Bass and I whilst I was very happy with them I wanted a bass that looked a bit ‘softer’ in style and more in keeping with the look of the rest of the band.

 I prefer a long scale, as I do not like the tone on short scales, which means for a semi acoustic/hollow body bass this does limit your choice but with good reviews I sought a SH Epi Jack Casady out.

 Made with I believe a maple body and mahogany neck, semi acoustic/hollow body  and modeled on the Gibson Les Paul Signature Bass by Jack Casaday , ex Jefferson Airplane/Hot Tuna, who I understand basically improved the pick up and Epiphone took it from there.

 However, what I was not expecting was how great this bass was and is and after six months remains probably my first choice over my others, and here’s why....

 Its my lightest at  3.89kg/8.58Ib and whilst neck dive could be an issue a wide strap, as usual, stops this. However is does tilt forward a bit, like a T Bird, but easily remedied with the right leg slightly forward or resting right hand on top to counter balance whilst playing. Some may not like this though.The strap button on the neck is really in the wrong place but because it is hollow I am reluctant to move onto the top arm, where I think it should be.  

 The neck is a mid size 1.66” wide at the nut and it does not get that much wider the further you go up meaning the dusty end is easier to play than a Fender that reverse tapers as you up the neck.

 The back is a shallow C and very very comfortable and better than my P Bass although probably not as good as my Jazz but very close.

 Its all in the tone though. It has a three way impedance switch and on lower 50 it has a vintage tone, on 250 sounds more like a P Bass and 500 adds a bit of grit.

 Now I appreciate that tone is personal, and I do prefer passive basses, but I find the Epi JC tone has a lot more depth, and sustain, than my other basses and my drummer prefers it, saying it also sounds smother. Now if this worries you I bought the bass from a much younger bassist who played it in a couple of hard rock bands. He just played on full 250 with the gritty almost distorted sound.

It does have that Gibson three point bridge though which has mixed reviews, but I can get on with it okay although your classic Fender style bridge is more user friendly.

 Also I would not want to change the electrics and although I understand you can work through the hole, if you remove the pick up, it would be very challenging. I just hope the jack socket does not detach itself from the wiring harness.

To conclude you get a lot of ‘bang for the buck’, it is greatly underrated and has a great tone. The quality and finish is good and is really incredible value for money. Having said this the lean forward and small neck dive  is annoying I must admit I do find it uncomfortable.

 

IMG_1585 (1).JPG

Edited by Shylock
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I concur. I had one exactly the same as yours a couple of years back and it really was a great bass. I think if I had another I would reposition the strap button (as others on BC have) to eliminate the tilting forward issue but as you say, it's not overly troublesome.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...
On 02/04/2020 at 22:09, Shylock said:

Brand:
Epiphone  

Model:
Jack Casady Signature Bass

 So here’s the thing...I only bought this bass in Sept 2019 because the band I was in decided we would do more lower level acoustic type numbers with the guitarist swapping his strat for a semi accounting and the drummer on a cajon.  My  other  main basses are a Gibbo T Bird, Fender US P and US J Bass and I whilst I was very happy with them I wanted a bass that looked a bit ‘softer’ in style and more in keeping with the look of the rest of the band.

 I prefer a long scale, as I do not like the tone on short scales, which means for a semi acoustic/hollow body bass this does limit your choice but with good reviews I sought a SH Epi Jack Casady out.

 Made with I believe a maple body and mahogany neck, semi acoustic/hollow body  and modeled on the Gibson Les Paul Signature Bass by Jack Casaday , ex Jefferson Airplane/Hot Tuna, who I understand basically improved the pick up and Epiphone took it from there.

 However, what I was not expecting was how great this bass was and is and after six months remains probably my first choice over my others, and here’s why....

 Its my lightest at  3.89kg/8.58Ib and whilst neck dive could be an issue a wide strap, as usual, stops this. However is does tilt forward a bit, like a T Bird, but easily remedied with the right leg slightly forward or resting right hand on top to counter balance whilst playing. Some may not like this though.The strap button on the neck is really in the wrong place but because it is hollow I am reluctant to move onto the top arm, where I think it should be.  

 The neck is a mid size 1.66” wide at the nut and it does not get that much wider the further you go up meaning the dusty end is easier to play than a Fender that reverse tapers as you up the neck.

 The back is a shallow C and very very comfortable and better than my P Bass although probably not as good as my Jazz but very close.

 Its all in the tone though. It has a three way impedance switch and on lower 50 it has a vintage tone, on 250 sounds more like a P Bass and 500 adds a bit of grit.

 Now I appreciate that tone is personal, and I do prefer passive basses, but I find the Epi JC tone has a lot more depth, and sustain, than my other basses and my drummer prefers it, saying it also sounds smother. Now if this worries you I bought the bass from a much younger bassist who played it in a couple of hard rock bands. He just played on full 250 with the gritty almost distorted sound.

It does have that Gibson three point bridge though which has mixed reviews, but I can get on with it okay although your classic Fender style bridge is more user friendly.

 Also I would not want to change the electrics and although I understand you can work through the hole, if you remove the pick up, it would be very challenging. I just hope the jack socket does not detach itself from the wiring harness.

To conclude you get a lot of ‘bang for the buck’, it is greatly underrated and has a great tone. The quality and finish is good and is really incredible value for money. Having said this the lean forward and small neck dive  is annoying I must admit I do find it uncomfortable.

 

IMG_1585 (1).JPG

I’m thinking of getting one, what’s the unplugged acoustic sound like? 

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13 hours ago, Shylock said:

To be honest not a louder  than a solid bass and I would not buy one if you plan to play unplugged. Probably best to get an acoustic bass.

Cheers for the info chap 👍

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I use mine unplugged for playing along with stuff I need to learn, but it is not very much louder than an unplugged Jazz bass.

Great basses plugged in, with a surprisingly wide tonal range, from Precision-like to quite snarly and aggressive.

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I had the same bass - bought for aesthetic reasons really - I didn't get on with it. It felt underpowered and the tonal package was pretty limited. Yes, I know it is a vintage design so I should have guessed but it just felt "out of date".

Sorry to be negative but I think that others have similar experiences which is why there are so many for sale used.

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I'm on my third Casady bass - the first two seemed great when I first got them but just got overlooked when I took out a bass to play. I bought my current one about 18 months ago, and it has been used for quite a few rehearsals and low-key gigs. I will fight the urge to sell it if it comes up as I know I will want another sooner or later.

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1 hour ago, TheGreek said:

I had the same bass - bought for aesthetic reasons really - I didn't get on with it. It felt underpowered and the tonal package was pretty limited. Yes, I know it is a vintage design so I should have guessed but it just felt "out of date".

Sorry to be negative but I think that others have similar experiences which is why there are so many for sale used.

Were you holding it the right way round? ;)

Only kidding - each to their own!

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