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gareth

So ..... what’s everyone doing

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2 hours ago, Dad3353 said:

I remember that one trip to Hastings, as a child (maybe 7 or 8..?). Spent the whole day, with a younger brother, at the police station, having somehow got separated from the rest of the family. :$ Our parents finally arrived, just in time for the drive back home. They say it's nice, though. :|

I think it's called 'affordable childcare'...

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1 minute ago, Stub Mandrel said:

I think it's called 'affordable childcare'...

It cost my parents a lost day's holiday enjoyment, quite a lot of stress, and the siblings to manage whilst they all scoured Hastings looking for us..! Fun for no-one, that day. :(

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A trip to Hastings nowerdays, you got to remember ya spare change and some bonios for the various dogs on bits of rope...

Said a little in jest, it is sad to see those that have fallen on hard times.

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14 minutes ago, dave moffat said:

Just signed up for a 4 week foundation Blues Harmonica course.

Is this an online course? If so, please post a link. I would love to do that..

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tomlinharmonicaschool/courses

should get you there.

I've had a special20 C for a few years but thought I should go back and learn properly from scratch, I've got a G, A and E on my wish list, just waiting for some cash to become spare.

Also trying to get my head round keys/chords on my 8 string baritone uke at the moment MmmMMmdim aargh! fair enough I 'spose but WTF are they, just a lot of hard work which doesn't suit the way my brain works but I'll get there if I do it a bit at a time.

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Setting up, tuning and recording my new drum kit. My previous kit, a 60 Rogers had no resonant heads, so I'm getting into a whole new world of pain with tuning the heads nicely. Toms sound immense,  still not sure about the bass drum yet. Was there a fashion for single headed drums in the 70s? I  know a few drummers who played concert toms. 

If anyone is interested ( @Dad3353?) it's a Gretsch in  smaller sizes, 12,14,18 inch shell pack, silver oyster pearl, Renown series. 

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11 minutes ago, MoonBassAlpha said:

Setting up, tuning and recording my new drum kit. My previous kit, a 60 Rogers had no resonant heads, so I'm getting into a whole new world of pain with tuning the heads nicely. Toms sound immense,  still not sure about the bass drum yet. Was there a fashion for single headed drums in the 70s? I  know a few drummers who played concert toms. 

If anyone is interested ( @Dad3353?) it's a Gretsch in  smaller sizes, 12,14,18 inch shell pack, silver oyster pearl, Renown series. 

Splendid drums, Gretsch. My drums are Camco (LA epoch...), reputed to have the tonal qualities of Gretsch coupled with the sonic power of Ludwig. I'm not complaining.
Single-headed was the fashion once PA's and mixer desks became available with enough channels for close-mic'ing the set. About that same time, the 'cardboard box' sound was everywhere, too, usually because the PA wasn't up to the job (no rack or compressors, gates and 31-band EQ yet...). Things have evolved yet again, and the proper acoustic qualities can now be recorded and projected 'live', so resonant heads are back..!
I have full, uncut, heads on my drums, including the bass drum, and have built a mic' into the shell, so no need to protrude through a port. Recommendation for heads..? Classic white, coated Remo ambassadors for that classic sound, batter and resonant, but I've changed (a couple of decades ago, now...) for Evans G2 top and bottom (12,13 and 16...), Genera Dry for snare batter, Hazy 300 snare resonant, G2 bass batter and G1 bass resonant.

For tuning, all heads off, I start with the resonant head (make sure all the lugs and rods are clean; a drop of oil on the threads is worthwhile...), then fit the head snugly onto the rim. Insert all the rods, just finger-tight all around. Wind each rod, one turn at a time, in 'star' fashion, until the head is free of wrinkles and starting to 'sound'. I'd normally 'lean' on the drum centre here, to be sure it's well bedded, using my forearm or elbow. From that point, still in 'star' mode, tap lightly about an inch from the edge, and tune until every lug has the same pitch. Once they're all sounding the same, tighten 'em up, a quarter-turn at a time, until the resonant pitch of the shell is heard. Each lug must have the same pitch; that's the important part. A shell has several 'sweet spots', it's a matter of taste and repertoire which to use, but best to use the same notion for the whole kit. Turn the drum over and do the other head, and tune to either equal, unison, resonance, or a 'dying' note when struck, according to taste.
I wouldn't normally tune a whole kit all in one session; I'd do a drum, take a break, do another, another break, then come back to the first for 'tweaks'. It takes me nearly a week if I'm changing the heads on the whole kit, but I do like a nice long tea break, so... Don't get me started on cymbals... 
Hope this helps. :friends:

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Thanks Dad, I  won't be tuning my cymbals right now! :)

I've got everything wide-open at the moment,  no damping.  It's taking some getting used to,  hearing the bass drum like that, the first recording I've just done sounds good with no reverb on any of it. Makes my small dead room sound bigger!

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29 minutes ago, MoonBassAlpha said:

Thanks Dad, I  won't be tuning my cymbals right now! :)

I've got everything wide-open at the moment,  no damping.  It's taking some getting used to,  hearing the bass drum like that, the first recording I've just done sounds good with no reverb on any of it. Makes my small dead room sound bigger!

I cheat. I have a pair of felt strips each side of centre on the resonant bass drum head, to keep the 'boom' in check. :$ Still plenty enough of it, though..! xD

Another tip for tuning, for those with less experience, is to use a good drum machine as a 'template' for the toms. I had an old Akai MPC something-or-other as a guide some decades ago; this helped me hone in on the range of sounds I should listen for.

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We moved today from a little flat where we'd been staying since returning from France. Bought a place in Norfolk. 

Feels a bit weird. We'll see how it goes.

 

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41 minutes ago, leschirons said:

We moved today from a little flat where we'd been staying since returning from France. Bought a place in Norfolk. 

Feels a bit weird. We'll see how it goes.

 

Where are you ending up? We are selling up in Cambridge and moving to north Norfolk this year.

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52 minutes ago, leschirons said:

We moved today from a little flat where we'd been staying since returning from France. Bought a place in Norfolk. 

Feels a bit weird. We'll see how it goes.

 

 


Why the decision to return to Blighty if you don’t mind me asking?

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5 hours ago, Dad3353 said:

I wouldn't normally tune a whole kit all in one session; I'd do a drum, take a break, do another, another break, then come back to the first for 'tweaks'. It takes me nearly a week if I'm changing the heads on the whole kit, but I do like a nice long tea break, so... Don't get me started on cymbals... 

Oh dear, I asked a drummer if he would set up my kit when I get it down here.

I thought I was asking for an hour or so of his time, not a month...

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8 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

Oh dear, I asked a drummer if he would set up my kit when I get it down here.

I thought I was asking for an hour or so of his time, not a month...

Stock up on Earl Grey and biscuits (if he's any good, naturally -_-...). B|

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28 minutes ago, Dad3353 said:

Stock up on Earl Grey and biscuits (if he's any good, naturally -_-...). B|

... I see, lull him into a false sense of security with biscuits, then poison him with the bergasol-flavoured brew.

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3 hours ago, leschirons said:

We moved today from a little flat where we'd been staying since returning from France. Bought a place in Norfolk. 

Feels a bit weird. We'll see how it goes.

Thats Norfolk - it is supposed to feel like that.

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On 11/04/2021 at 22:07, nilebodgers said:

Where are you ending up? We are selling up in Cambridge and moving to north Norfolk this year.

We've moved to Necton. Between Swaffham and Dereham.

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On 11/04/2021 at 22:15, gareth said:

 


Why the decision to return to Blighty if you don’t mind me asking?

Nothing to do with Brexit I hasten to add. We had french residency. Various reasons really. We had no grand-children when we moved out and now have three. Needed to see more of the family. Place was massive and couldn't handle the work, got fed up with running the gite and three hours a week cutting 2 acres of grass with a tractor. Coming to the end of my playing what with arthritis and stuff and a family health issue. So I guess, just a time of life thing really.  If you're not too old, it's a great life out there with lots of opportunities for gigging to boot (Before Covid)

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2 minutes ago, leschirons said:

Nothing to do with Brexit I hasten to add. We had french residency. Various reasons really. We had no grand-children when we moved out and now have three. Needed to see more of the family. Place was massive and couldn't handle the work, got fed up with running the gite and three hours a week cutting 2 acres of grass with a tractor. Coming to the end of my playing what with arthritis and stuff and a family health issue. So I guess, just a time of life thing really.  If you're not too old, it's a great life out there with lots of opportunities for gigging to boot (Before Covid)

Very interesting points 

I sometimes find myself looking at properties with masses of rooms, land and outbuildings and saying to myself - you could afford that why not buy it?

Well assets can be liabilities too including property 

Its not just the buying of property that is the problem but it’s maintenance 

So although we can buy a landed property can we maintain it either by ourselves or paying others? Can we be bothered to do this?

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8 hours ago, gareth said:

Very interesting points 

I sometimes find myself looking at properties with masses of rooms, land and outbuildings and saying to myself - you could afford that why not buy it?

Well assets can be liabilities too including property 

Its not just the buying of property that is the problem but it’s maintenance 

So although we can buy a landed property can we maintain it either by ourselves or paying others? Can we be bothered to do this?

You're right of course. Property is very cheap in some departments. Beautiful countryside,  better weather etc but we Brits all (most) make the same mistake and buy big not realising that more buildings means more renovation and upkeep.

We bought a small hamlet. Three houses with three barns. One we lived in, another was our gite and the third was my studio.  Sounds great, but two sceptic tanks, five roofs, double glazing all round and all the internal renovation soon turns your 70,000€ purchase into a 170,000€ investment. 

99% of folks will never recover their outlay when they sell. We were lucky in as much that we had exactly what the buyer wanted and managed to make a healthy profit but that is very rare. 

If you go, it needs to be for the lifestyle as it'll be the worst financial decision you'll ever make if you don't keep a property back in the UK.

We had 16 years in France. Time to come back for us now but don't regret one single minute of that period.

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We bought a remote 'longère' cottage for (equivalent of...) £6000 in 1980. No water, no sanitation, no electricity, small garden, no dependences (but with 'phone line..!). It took us a year to get water and sanitation, twenty to get electricity, ten more to get a rain-proof roof, five more to get running hot water. There's still more to do (one day I may be able to fit proper windows...).
On the other hand, I've always managed to take work I liked, with no mortgage worries, our three children grew up healthy, well-schooled and happy, and I'm now able to relax in retirement, doing a bit of gardening when I can, with excellent (distant...) neighbours and friends. It's a concept, and probably not for everyone. Adopting wholesale the local language and much of its culture is a 'must' (this is probably true of any expatriation...). Maybe I've just been lucky, though. B|

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7 minutes ago, Dad3353 said:

We bought a remote 'longère' cottage for (equivalent of...) £6000 in 1980. No water, no sanitation, no electricity, small garden, no dependences (but with 'phone line..!). It took us a year to get water and sanitation, twenty to get electricity, ten more to get a rain-proof roof, five more to get running hot water. There's still more to do (one day I may be able to fit proper windows...).
On the other hand, I've always managed to take work I liked, with no mortgage worries, our three children grew up healthy, well-schooled and happy, and I'm now able to relax in retirement, doing a bit of gardening when I can, with excellent (distant...) neighbours and friends. It's a concept, and probably not for everyone. Adopting wholesale the local language and much of its culture is a 'must' (this is probably true of any expatriation...). Maybe I've just been lucky, though. B|

I don't think it's a case of being lucky,  but the fact that you've done it right, and, for the right reasons. As you say, you need to embrace the culture and language to make it work, which we did. Met some of the most wonderful people, played with some great musicians and was able to choose what I did.  

If I  were 50 again or a little younger, I'd do it all again. Sounds like you've had a great life Douglas.👍

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