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P Basses - they all sound the same!


gareth

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Only just seen this 

It’s a shame that the basses used don’t include some USA fenders!

I would like to see included

Fullerton Reissue 57 and 62 p basses

Original p basses - 1953, 1955, 1957, 1962, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1982 

I am willing to bet a heap of money that - they ALL sound pretty much the same!

Can you tell the difference?

Does it really justify the difference in price - £100 to £10000+ ???

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For me it’s been a case of finding the ones that feel right and that sound right. Yes they’ve all sounded like P-basses, subtle differences, none - aside from one - that would probably be noticed in the mix. I’ve now found the right ones, the US 2012-16 Series. I also really liked the Road Worns when I played them, albeit briefly.

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1 hour ago, AngelDeVille said:

I can definitely notice a difference in the tonewoods...

This is interesting... I always think of a P Bass having a very pure woody sound. The electronics are about as basic as it can get so it would make sense that a larger percentage of the overall tone came from the wood itself. Certainly as opposed to something very electronics heavy like a Wal.

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1 minute ago, CamdenRob said:

This is interesting... I always think of a P Bass having a very pure woody sound. The electronics are about as basic as it can get so it would make sense that a larger percentage of the overall tone came from the wood itself. Certainly as opposed to something very electronics heavy like a Wal.

I was mostly going by the smell...

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I am sure that there would be more of a difference if that player wasn't palm muting the strings. It's not a good comparison video in that respect.

It's easy to make P basses can sound similar, but you can also make them sound different. I've had several which had very different sounds . There is little similarity between the sounds of James Jamerson and JJ Burnel.

The one good thing that is probably common between all P basses is the authority and solidity of the notes.

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A more useful and educational video would be to show a skilled player just playing ONE decent Precision but showing just how many completely different sounds you can get from a P just by using:

(1) Different strings and RH positions

(2) Careful choice of sounding techniques and pressures (both LH and RH).

That is the true wonder of the simple P bass.   :thank_you:

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2 hours ago, musicbassman said:

A more useful and educational video would be to show a skilled player just playing ONE decent Precision but showing just how many completely different sounds you can get from a P just by using:

(1) Different strings and RH positions

(2) Careful choice of sounding techniques and pressures (both LH and RH).

That is the true wonder of the simple P bass.   :thank_you:

I don’t doubt what you say is true 

It was just fascinating to watch the bloke get the same sound from a £100 fender affinity ply bodied p bass and more expensive ones

My feeling is that he would have got the same sound from an Andy Baxter pre CBS fender p bass costing £1000’s

Moneys funny isn’t it

 

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14 hours ago, dave_bass5 said:

At a gig they all sound the same out front. 

True dat and applies more widely than to just a P bass. Leaving aside major differences in playing styles (slap vs Jamerson, for example) and more extreme variations in type of instrument (6 string with fanned frets, etc vs P bass with flats), basses, especially if run through the PA, do tend to can sound pretty similar to an audience. Tonal variations are mainly for our benefit as players. If we like the way our instrument sounds, we'll enjoy the experience more and probably play better. 

Edited by Dan Dare
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20 minutes ago, Dan Dare said:

. Tonal variations are mainly for our benefit as players. If we like the way our instrument sounds, we'll enjoy the experience more and probably play better. 

That's how i look on it. If we are happy and content with our tone we play better and enjoy it more. 

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