Jump to content
Left leaderboard
Happy Jack

Maya Precision - curious about the pickup

Recommended Posts

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MAYA-PASSIVE-PRECISION-ELECTRIC-BASS-GUITAR-1974-MADE-IN-JAPAN-MIJ/264436324171?hash=item3d91a2174b:g:q~0AAOSwxq5dSdm5

In my experience, these are very well-made instruments let down by poor electronics - stick a decent pickup in it, replace the speed knobs (and maybe the pots), maybe even fit a 4-saddle BBOT, and you've got a very nice Precision.

All of which said, I don't recognise the fitted pickup at all ... is it original?

@Bassassin ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice looking example...the price range on these is huge though. I've seen them for over £500

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used to own a Maya with the more standard P split pickup. It was a gorgeous bass.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maya's just a brand name, and you'll find it on a wide range of instruments of various quality levels.

This is a pretty low-end bass - ply body, 2-saddle bridge and that little Tele-type pickup. These parts were intended to be hidden under the chrome covers it would have had when new. They're very common on low-end MIJ copies, here are a couple which have passed through my own shed:

image.thumb.png.6061680843f3a71aac49ae28c9e54ae8.png

image.thumb.png.2d577460f569066a79af7f7b2cb0adce.png

If you look closely, you'll notice the J is a Maya. The exact same bass was sold in the UK branded Avon. They go for a lot less money...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure @Bassassin could list the decent brands of MIJ's, there are lots of low end stuff and crazy prices.

I had a Maya jazz, was made ok, pickups were very weak, everything except the neck and body needed changing, and it weighed as much as a small planet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I like this one, I've had it over 30 years, used to gig it regularly. I think its about 1987. Gave it some TLC earlier this year, replaced the broken pickguard put ashtrays on it (they had disappeared when i got it) (it's a split P-pickup under the chrome):

 

Maya.thumb.jpg.744f9468bdd70568aa74d607b2016c0c.jpg

Edited by Stub Mandrel
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Stub Mandrel said:

I like this one, I've had it over 30 years, used to gig it regularly. I think its about 1987. Gave it some TLC earlier this year, replaced the broken pickguard put ashtrays on it (they had disappeared when i got it) (it's a split P-pickup under the chrome):

 

Maya.thumb.jpg.744f9468bdd70568aa74d607b2016c0c.jpg

😢 I miss mine. 

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bass in the original post is exactly the same as the bass I played on in high school, only that had a different brand name - "Tempo". I remember the pickup, the tele style bridge, the tuners and the metal plate over the truss rod. The was very early on in my bass playing, and with time I came to notice all the difference between it and a real Fender - the obvious being the pickup, but then realising all the other little differences as well. I don't think I've ever seen another bass with at Tele type pickup until you posted this. The tuners, on the other hand, are really typical for basses from this period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These would have been sold with a load of different names - Chushin Gakki (the factory that made them) was probably the biggest manufacturer of low/midrange copy-era stuff during the 70s, and importers all around the world all put their own brands on them.

On the whole, despite being built to a budget, they're usually perfectly playable instruments - there's definitely a consistent good quality in necks & fretwork on instruments of that era. I think back in the day a lot of us (me included) considered them junk because we had no clue about setting our instruments up properly.

Those closed-back Gotoh tuners on so many of these basses get a bad rap, but that didn't stop the likes of Shergold using them.

image.png.7c3c63837d76de12849bc47725931d40.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So my understanding is that a company (usually in Japan/Asia) would create the instruments, and then you'd have a distributor in each country taking a boatload, branding them for the local market, and away you go. Is that about it?

Whenever I see those tuners, they make my cringe!!!! Hahahaha! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, exactly that, but instead of one distributor, loads. Anyone could (and still can) order direct from a factory/exporter, as long a you bought a minimum quantity, and have instruments badged up as they pleased. Many of the 70s UK brands, such as Grant, Shaftesbury, Avon etc were just imported by music shops, sold in their own retail premises & also distributed to other outlets around the country.

In the 70s you'd end up with the situation where retailers would have the same instruments with different badges (and often different price tags) hanging side-by-side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Bassassin said:

Those closed-back Gotoh tuners on so many of these basses

Tempting to put clover leaf tuners on mine though - it's an almost perfect clone of an early 70s Precision otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...