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1966 Jazz Bass restored on BBC show 'The Repair Shop'.

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2 minutes ago, hiram.k.hackenbacker said:

I think so. I watched all of it. Why’s that?

 

3 minutes ago, hiram.k.hackenbacker said:

I think so. I watched all of it. Why’s that?

I think you are not catching my drift  fella. I'm asking for info about the string spacing. 

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It takes a great deal of skill to get the string spacing wrong on a standard Fender bridge - It would be interesting to see how it was achieved...

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6 hours ago, Stub Mandrel said:

It takes a great deal of skill to get the string spacing wrong on a standard Fender bridge - It would be interesting to see how it was achieved...

I bet it had threaded saddles. It's very easy to mis-route those. Although unforgivable for a professional luthier to do it imo.

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1 hour ago, BreadBin said:

I bet it had threaded saddles. It's very easy to mis-route those. Although unforgivable for a professional luthier to do it imo.

I'm pretty sure it did.

 

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11 hours ago, hiram.k.hackenbacker said:

I know I'm being ultra picky, but if you're going to set a bass up and show it on national television, I would make sure the string spacing is spot on.

The other thing that bugged me slightly was that we didn't get to see if there were any issues with the business end of the set up, neck relief etc.

 

Screenshot 2019-04-29 at 21.16.31.png

I’m surprised they didn’t drive the bass around to your house for a quick play to be honest. 

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34 minutes ago, hiram.k.hackenbacker said:

I’m not sure what you’re getting at, but I assume it’s sarcasm. My comment was merely an abservation. Even string spacing is important to me. I can feel it when it’s uneven and am a little puzzled as to why someone who is capable of all the repairs shown didn’t make sure it was spot on. FWIW, I completely agree regarding the neck shave. I think that was a fabulous piece of work given that it was never carried out in order to re-sell the bass. Good on him for thinking of it 👍

It was, and I apologise. 

It's a tea time TV programme that's highly superficial. The string spacing can often appear 'off' in images (depending on the angle), but in real life could be fine. One of the production crew could have placed it on the stand in a heavy handed way, or the images could have been taken before the set up was completed. Who knows?

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Not seen the program. I don't subscribe. But it sounds awful.

Programs like this are another situation where it's easy to forget making this program isn't about "restoration" or "being faithful to the original" or "maintaining the value" etc, it's about making cheap TV for the masses. It fills between the news and will appeal to the armchair-huggers who'll watch, say "that's nice" and keep the ratings up to justify keeping the TV Tax going.

Thanks for posting. It's always good to have a cringe once in a while.

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9 minutes ago, Grangur said:

Not seen the program. I don't subscribe. But it sounds awful.

It isn't awful, imo it's actually one few half decent programmes on TV and I'm the type of person who finds the vast majority of TV content mindless, boring and usually exploitative. 

The coverage of the bass resto was a little disappointing (I agree with the general consensus that there's no need for the ashtray and pickup covers), and I would liked to have seen what electrical work was done etc. but, from what I've seen, most of the restorations shown are done to a very high and sympathetic standard.

Like all TV shows these days, there is a relentlessly formulaic approach, with all the items needing to have a sob story attached and tearful reveals. There is way too much filler (pointless establishing shots, repeated "story lines"), BUT if recorded and all that nonsense fast forwarded through to the key points, watching highly skilled restorers at work is absolutely fascinating. In particular, the ceramicist is exceptional. 

Just my opinion obviously, but writing it off because bass guitar aficionados weren't happy with what was actually a pretty successful resto of a beautiful bass with an interesting history seems a bit group think to me. 

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@StevieE I'm clearly too cynical. "Awful" was also the wrong word.  "Disappointing"  would have been better.

Clearly I didn't see the bass, or the program, but I wouldn't have shaved the neck before trying, at least to sweat the dents out. If the wood grain is broken this won't work, but it's got to be worth a try. 

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9 minutes ago, Grangur said:

@StevieE I'm clearly too cynical. "Awful" was also the wrong word.  "Disappointing"  would have been better.

Clearly I didn't see the bass, or the program, but I wouldn't have shaved the neck before trying, at least to sweat the dents out. If the wood grain is broken this won't work, but it's got to be worth a try. 

Hah cynical is my middle name! :) 

Totally agree, the neck shave did seem excessive but from what they showed of the damage, it looked more of a gauge than a dent. 

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1 hour ago, hiram.k.hackenbacker said:

This is the damage in question.

Screenshot 2019-04-30 at 13.13.22.png

A combination of keratosis of the thumb and only ever playing in G?

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Thanks for the picture @hiram.k.hackenbacker

3 minutes ago, Stub Mandrel said:

A combination of keratosis of the thumb and only ever playing in G?

Wearing a thumb ring maybe?

You could sand that, but it would take a month of Sundays and the net result would be the same as shaving, especially as the contour of the neck needs to be maintain the neck profile down the whole neck. So shaving would be better.

You could use filler, but it's "in the eye of the beholder" if you think that would look good. I'm not so keen, even if you used wood sawdust and glue. You also need to be sure you'd get a smooth finish and maintain the consistency of the profile. Then, re-staining to keep the aged colour of the wood after you've used filler would be hard. It's far easier to shave and work with natural wood.

Veneer or replacing a lump of wood won't work and would look wrong. You also couldn't match the grain.

After all, I recon the restorer did the right thing. I accept some won't agree with the neck profile being changed, but what you're primarily after is a playable instrument. The only way to keep it the same would be a replacement neck or accept something that doesn't look so good. I guess that to some, the look doesn't matter as long as the punters can't see?

So on reflection. I can't think of an alternative better than shaving it or don't do the damage in the first place.

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13 minutes ago, Pea Turgh said:

Anyone care to take a guess at the before & after values?

What value do you put on the "Hot Chocolate" content?"

IMHO is this about as relevant as guessing TV producer's mobile phone number? (Except for curiosity, but it's not for sale.) 

Edited by Grangur

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On the neck shave, the guy who did the work is on another forum.  He said it was bad enough to get splinters from and that he had no alternative.

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Looked like a nice job to me as a non-luthier.  The chaps son was happy with it, so I guess that's all that matters.

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I remember reading some magazines 70's or 80's ,where HC bassman telling about his very high action on bass,he liked and talked about tone benefits of that(can't remember exact).First I spoted that and they marked as problem.I'm not expert in repairs, bit this looks average.Customer seams happy,and that's it.

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1 hour ago, Grangur said:

What value do you put on the "Hot Chocolate" content?"

IMHO is this about as relevant as guessing TV producer's mobile phone number? (Except for curiosity, but it's not for sale.) 

I’m not knocking the workmanship (I liked the end result), just genuinely interested as these things tend to sell for sooo much!  People say refinishing reduces the value, but what is the effect of the work here?  Can be general terms, not just this exact bass.

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23 minutes ago, Pea Turgh said:

I’m not knocking the workmanship (I liked the end result), just genuinely interested as these things tend to sell for sooo much!  People say refinishing reduces the value, but what is the effect of the work here?  Can be general terms, not just this exact bass.

66 Jazz with that province had to be the best part of £6-8k

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3 hours ago, StevieE said:

66 Jazz with that province had to be the best part of £6-8k

There's currently a red '66 Jazz in Hanks on Denmark Street for £9k. 

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23 minutes ago, jay-syncro said:

There's currently a red '66 Jazz in Hanks on Denmark Street for £9k. 

If it's in Denmark Street it will be overpriced though.

The provenance of that one probably has to add a bit to the value.

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24 minutes ago, jay-syncro said:

There's currently a red '66 Jazz in Hanks on Denmark Street for £9k. 

There you go! 

I was looking at Andy Baxters website and his 60s Jazzes range from £5k to £8.5k... I would expect Denmark St to be more expensive though, apparently their rates are horrendous these days.

I doubt it'll ever come on the market though so it's arbitrary really. 

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One of our guitarists was playing a genuine 66 Tele tonight. Looked a bit hurt when I asked if it was relicked or real.

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10 hours ago, crunchman said:

If it's in Denmark Street it will be overpriced though.

...and a 50% chance it is a fake or an undisclosed refin...

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