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Bridgehouse

Utter disaster. I give up.

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7 minutes ago, Teebs said:

Not even me?! :sorry:

:D

Especially not you. You'll be straight down crack converters to fund your next fix of 'plaster' Jamas 😜

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1 minute ago, Bridgehouse said:

Just ran a raffle with just your name in the hat 

 

Weirdly, Rick 4000 won it....

Now, we have the proof we were looking for. Same person. :tatice_03:

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1 hour ago, Bridgehouse said:

Keeping it is edging it at the moment. I need to play it tonight to see how I feel about it. 

I think you need to play it - I reckon you'll get a feel for if it is an instrument you'll fall back in love within a few minutes.

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1 hour ago, Si600 said:

You'll be straight down crack converters to fund your next fix of 'plaster' Jamas

This bass has already been to Crack Convertors once... 

 

 

(with apologies to Mr. Shuker, but the pun was irresistible)

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I had a Warwick Streamer bass that I loved. I had a big gig and it failed. I got it fixed but I could never trust the bass again and sold it on here within a few weeks.

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3 hours ago, Bridgehouse said:

And that should be enough to keep it, right?

It probably is. But the fact that I’m asking the question worries me.

On a more serious note I can understand your quandary completely. No matter how beautiful it is or the amount of work done to repair it your personal experience with this particular bass has nonetheless been jaded. It’s really very little to do with the physical item itself, It’s much more psychological than that. I actually think you need to ignore all of us and see if you can reconnect with it, if you can then great, but if you can’t I don’t think you shouldn’t worry. Our relationships with things as personal as musical instruments is finely, finely balanced. Good luck Sir.

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I wouldn’t rush into any decision. The trauma attached to such an event needs time to process and hopefully recover from. It’s still raw. Leave it in the case and get on with life. You’ll wake up one day and know the answer. 

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I thought that was a stunningly beautiful looking bass when I saw the picture. I once waited six months for a custom built Sandberg and, six weeks after arrival, the neck warped and twisted so it had to go back for a new neck. It’s been perfect ever since though. Don’t give up on it!

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Having waited for several years for IMO the most beautiful bass ever made to come up for sale, and not being sure it ever would TBH, then finding I had no money when it actually did and letting it slide for ages, only to finally end up with it my hands, Id say keep it. Its gorgeous, as an objet d'art its worth it surely 

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On 12/12/2019 at 13:19, Frank Blank said:

On a more serious note I can understand your quandary completely. No matter how beautiful it is or the amount of work done to repair it your personal experience with this particular bass has nonetheless been jaded. It’s really very little to do with the physical item itself, It’s much more psychological than that. I actually think you need to ignore all of us and see if you can reconnect with it, if you can then great, but if you can’t I don’t think you shouldn’t worry. Our relationships with things as personal as musical instruments is finely, finely balanced. Good luck Sir.

 

On 12/12/2019 at 13:29, KingPrawn said:

I wouldn’t rush into any decision. The trauma attached to such an event needs time to process and hopefully recover from. It’s still raw. Leave it in the case and get on with life. You’ll wake up one day and know the answer. 

Two fine examples of sage advice on this point. Give it time. I wish you either a joyful reconciliation or a painless parting of the ways.

Bridgehouse, I'll just add a slightly different point of view. If your bass weren't such a lovely and distinctive example, I doubt you'd have much trouble knowing what to do. It looks like a work of art to me. Works of art often need drastic restoration. That can be quite traumatic (and very expensive) for the owner but, in time, the trauma fades. The beauty doesn't, nor does the underlying emotional attachment.

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How long had you had this bass before the truss rod failed? Some top end basses have rather long warranty periods. And if they don't, maybe they should.

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18 hours ago, 12stringbassist said:

How long had you had this bass before the truss rod failed? Some top end basses have rather long warranty periods. And if they don't, maybe they should.

Bought second hand so no warranty implied at all. 

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I'd keep it. It's probably the best looking bass on this forum so worth it just for bragging rights!

 

When you get a fretless that's just "right" and sounds exactly like what you hear in your head then you should keep it, the fact that it looking the way it does should reinforce that. Definitely worth a few months of playing/gigging IMO.

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An update.

 

I’ve been off the bass for a wee bit (just a break) and a few weeks back decided to start practising again. Once lockdown is over there’s a whole series of jams and gigs to do, so I figured it was time to start up again.

 

I’m usually a creature of habit.. but this time I picked up the Shuker to start with. It’s the only bass I’ve played for the last few weeks. I look at other basses, but no. 
 

It’s actually better than it was. Solid, stable, more sustain and more tone. I have no idea why. It’s now officially the best bass I’ve ever played. 
 

I have even looked at the 64 Precision and thought “I should probably sell you”. I know, right?

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Glad to hear it all worked out well! Sling the Precision and enjoy the Shuker, finally working as intended. 

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4 minutes ago, Chris2112 said:

Glad to hear it all worked out well! Sling the Precision and enjoy the Shuker, finally working as intended. 

Probably a bit pricey just to sling the Precision ;)

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When the notification popped up for this threas I admit to thinking "what was that about?". So I read the start again to remind me before I read the update. 

This is definitely and officially a Good Outcome! Here's to many more years of gigging.

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You definitely still need a p bass with a fretless. It’s like the antidote for when you need something other than mwah. 

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