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neilp

Fingerboard oil

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Does anyone recognise this, and know if it's still available? I bought several cans around 30 years ago from a shop that was closing down. This is the last one, and it's so good that I'd love to have some more... It may well be neat linseed oil, but the can's pretty cool too! I'm a sucker for tradition...... 

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My DB repairer used (Yamaha) Bore Oil but I cannot find out whats actually in it. This link should take you to Amazon for one make of Bore oil but no list of what oils are used though it states absolutely no Lemon oil in it!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/MN702-Cleaner-Conditioner-Wooden-Instruments/dp/B00LWH8YOO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1536596030&sr=8-1&keywords=bore+oil+clarinet

 

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Gets the crud off without drying out the wood. Vodka (or alcohol swabs) will do the same thing, but take the oil out of the wood.

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Is there any oil left in the wood after 150 years? (apart from that absorbed from my sweaty fingers)?

Tried turpentine (the proper pine tree derived stuff) once, possibly less "drying"; worked much the same as vodka but smelt nicer.

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I don't suppose for a second your bass still has the original fingerboard. Ebony seems to be very durable though, and If it is the original, it will have been oiled periodically.

Turpentine is almost certainly better than vodka....

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On 13/09/2018 at 20:08, NickA said:

What does it do? 

I've been using neat vodka.

In case your question was relative to oil and 'Bore Oil'....as used for woodwind instruments to protect against moisture in the bore of the instrument, and on fingerboards to keep a degree of moisture content in the wood and help prevent drying out. Woods are usually pre dried by kiln or air dried naturally for years for luthier build requirements to help stop expansion and contraction of wood once it has been cut and made into a guitar. I use it once maybe twice a year on my (macassar ebony) fingerboard, dabbed onto a cloth, applied to just simply wet along the board then wiped down with a clean cloth.

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Or you could use something that was designed specifically to clean and nourish wood like lemon oil:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Parker-Bailey-Natural-Lemon-Oil-Furniture-Guitar-Fretboard-Cleaner-and-Polish/182994307206?epid=6007038582&hash=item2a9b4f8886:g:en0AAOSwd7BZpT82

You can find smaller and cheaper sizes but this will last you a few years and doesnt expire...

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Bore oil, fingerboard oil, lemon oil, linseed oil, walnut oil all do the same job, pretty much. I don't need advice about what to clean my fingerboard with. I was just wondering if I could get some more of what I already have. Seems like the answer is either "no" or "here's the answer to a question you didn't ask". Internet...

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I Googled around a bit and found a reference to "Fingerboard Oil-Number One" manufactured by Logic Promotions in Monmouth Gwent on the Rob Chapman(Chapman guitars)forum.Same stuff?Maybe he has a source.It was in a post dated from April 2018.

Edited by Staggering on

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