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thebigyin

Anyone a member of Scotts Bass Academy?

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1 hour ago, Woodinblack said:

Funnily enough 49 was the year when my gigging level shot right up, I have been consistently gigging in the 5 years since then.

I'm 65 and gigging more than ever. I just happened to join the right band with the right infrastructure 7 years ago.

Opportunities with bands with consistent bookings are hard to come by regardless of where you live.

Blue

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The YouTube stuff seems to be a more common complaint these days, but if I remember correctly there was some sort of change to the Youtube algorythm lately that prompted a need for longer videos to keep your visibility up or something like that.

Anyway, I've been a member for the past 3 years.  I've learned a lot.  I would go as far as to say Scott's 'Harmonic Layering' course on there is the best thing you can do to learn about harmony aside from a one to one teacher.  Even then some one to one teachers are awful.

The other thing he really drives home is the need to actually put the work in if you really want to get better - which is the thing which has probably had the most impact on my playing.  I never had a structured practice routine until I joined, now I do..........

So yeh, I would recommend him!

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On 04/06/2018 at 19:54, Bluewine said:

IMO, Scott is only for guys willing and able to do the hard work.

This. SBL is well worth it if you've got the time to make the most of it.

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1 hour ago, adamg67 said:

This. SBL is well worth it if you've got the time to make the most of it.

+1

I joined right at the start and when I came to renew, I'd had pretty much zero value out of it due to lack of time.  So I didn't renew and wished Scott all the best with his venture.  I also decided that I'm not the type of person that learns from watching videos.  It's worth watching the videos on YouTube to find out if Scott's voice grates on you.  Also, it's worth noting that you should download the videos etc as you won't have access to them if you cancel your membership.

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I had been considering joining for a while and this thread renewed my interest so I joined up last week.

I'm finding it very helpful so far and have already watched a number of lessons. Very well laid out web site and the tutors including Scott are very likeable and easy to follow.

Downloaded some of the podcasts too to listen to in my car.

Like has been said above you need to put the time in  to get your moneys worth and I'm fortunate now that my wife is out most evenings so once the kids are in bed I can have an hour on my bass every night.

 

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The videos look good (the ones I’ve seen). As someone who was a teacher before, results are all about the effort you put in. It’s a platitude, but it’s absolutely true. You can’t get the most out of these things until you’re doing one or two hours of solid, focused practice every day at least. And simply watching a video once isn’t enough to internalise a concept.

The only slight gripe I have with the courses promoted by some bigger agencies and organisations is that they sell a dream that doesn’t exist. There are few studio jobs anymore, and there are a whole host of name session players already on the books. Touring musicians aren’t as in demand either so we’re churning out more and more pro-level players with few opportunities for them to make a living.

It’s not Scott’s fault and this isn’t a criticism levelled at him as his courses are targeted at players of all ages and abilities, but apart from the odd success story I’ve met lots of incredible musicians that haven’t found a route into the industry and we’re training hundreds more.

Anyway, a lesson with a pro player in Bristol where I am is £35. That’s money well spent. If you’re in the sticks or haven’t got a great teacher nearby, then I think this is a worthwhile substitute. But the first opportunity you get head out and play with others, because we really don’t need any more bedroom virtuosos who can’t hold down a groove.

 

 

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I think Scott's lessons are excellent.  They work very well for me, and I've been a lifer for a couple of years now.  Money well spent IMO but, like anything else, it won't suit everyone.

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On 16/06/2018 at 11:20, Burns-bass said:

The videos look good (the ones I’ve seen). As someone who was a teacher before, results are all about the effort you put in. It’s a platitude, but it’s absolutely true. You can’t get the most out of these things until you’re doing one or two hours of solid, focused practice every day at least. And simply watching a video once isn’t enough to internalise a concept.

The only slight gripe I have with the courses promoted by some bigger agencies and organisations is that they sell a dream that doesn’t exist. There are few studio jobs anymore, and there are a whole host of name session players already on the books. Touring musicians aren’t as in demand either so we’re churning out more and more pro-level players with few opportunities for them to make a living.

It’s not Scott’s fault and this isn’t a criticism levelled at him as his courses are targeted at players of all ages and abilities, but apart from the odd success story I’ve met lots of incredible musicians that haven’t found a route into the industry and we’re training hundreds more.

Anyway, a lesson with a pro player in Bristol where I am is £35. That’s money well spent. If you’re in the sticks or haven’t got a great teacher nearby, then I think this is a worthwhile substitute. But the first opportunity you get head out and play with others, because we really don’t need any more bedroom virtuosos who can’t hold down a groove.

 

 

This is very true, and not something many players find out until it’s a bit too late. I got out of the “industry” when I saw how things were going (no radio or jingle jobs anymore, major London studios closing down one after the other). However, I believe by not needing to earn income from playing music, you’re freed up to a) be able to afford decent gear and b) pursue musical excellence and play music with musicians you like. One of the worst things about being a “pro” player was the awful novelty gigs, playing styles and genres I didn’t much care for and having to rely on teaching in order to survive, rather than because I really wanted to teach. To his credit, Scott certainly has a great deal of enthusiasm for playing and music!

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52 minutes ago, FDC484950 said:

This is very true, and not something many players find out until it’s a bit too late. I got out of the “industry” when I saw how things were going (no radio or jingle jobs anymore, major London studios closing down one after the other). However, I believe by not needing to earn income from playing music, you’re freed up to a) be able to afford decent gear and b) pursue musical excellence and play music with musicians you like. One of the worst things about being a “pro” player was the awful novelty gigs, playing styles and genres I didn’t much care for and having to rely on teaching in order to survive, rather than because I really wanted to teach. To his credit, Scott certainly has a great deal of enthusiasm for playing and music!

That’s a great way to look at it.

if Scott’s courses inspire you to pick up the bass, then they’re doing the right thing!

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I've been a member since the beginning - massive resource of knowledge. If you want to learn how to play bass, get better or get great, there a course. If you just want to noodle around - no point joining. If you are serious about getting better, there isn't a better online resource. In my opinion. 

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17 hours ago, OutSpoon said:

I've been a member since the beginning - massive resource of knowledge. If you want to learn how to play bass, get better or get great, there a course. If you just want to noodle around - no point joining. If you are serious about getting better, there isn't a better online resource. In my opinion. 

Very true. If all you want is  to ask others for TABs and know just enough to busk your way through a few covers and, then SBL isn't the place for you.  

TABs is something that simply doesn't get a mention on SBL.

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@devinebass I'd love to signup and lifetime seems a good deal and in a year I might have the cash.  HOWEVER...

I have piles and piles of free tabs for every genre of music and if I just spend a few years learning all of those, surely that's the way to go as its all about songs at the end of the day?   Dont get me wrong I have the discipline and devotion to work through courses and lessons - its just that songs are the real thing.

I spent my first year of playing doing "learn XYZ bass" (replace XYZ with funk, muted grooves, walking sloth, scratchy barnacles, turf and surf etc) type of books and it did nothing for me like simply learning songs.

I would love to hear your thoughts on this Scott, but apologies if it puts you on the spot!!

 

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6 minutes ago, cgullcharlie said:

...its all about songs at the end of the day?...

Not a bad way of going about things, but maybe there's a distinction between 'learning songs' and 'learning music'..? I'm a drummer, and spent a long time learning and practising the rudiments of drumming (hours at a time on just snare drum stuff, or syncopation, or tom rolls, or cymbal swells etc...). It then became possible to play almost any 'song', even if I'd never heard it before, or pick up on the 'hook' parts if there was a specific drum part. For what I was doing at the time (variety drumming, and depping...), it was far more useful than songs, and indispensable for creating my own drum parts for original material. There's no 'song' to copy when one is writing the song oneself..! ;)

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Hi,

My 2 cents worth, your milage may vary.

Having never played a bass before I got the bug just before Christmas and joined up to Scotts bass Lessons.

Pro's

  • Excellent production quality of materials, definitely not filmed on an iPhone 5 in his bedroom. 
  • Scotts  a normal guy, I could quiet easy spend spending an evening in the pub with him, he definitely doesn't talk down his nose to you.
  • Clearly respected by his peers far and wide, as they produce a multitude of courses and other training material for SBL
  • Cost is reasonable. I live in the sticks and pay £22 an hour for tuition (a bargain) twice a month, so its 3 months of lesson and definitely spend more than the subscription on coffee for the  month.
  • Laid back approach to equipment reviews, especially loved the bits where he compares a £11k bass against one for £100 from Amazon. definitely proves you dont need to sell a kidney to get a good bass.
  • Huge amount of courses.

And heres the rub for me.

I mention above that I am a beginner, and I was looking for someone to guide me through the learning process. 

For example do course A then B then C (Like unlocking levels in the video game), as you progress more lesson are revealed.

However whilst there are a huge number of sessions/courses, for me it was like typing I want to buy a computer into Amazon, there are just too many options available, and for me it just led to confusion.

I could have kept my membership, but decided it was better to cancel my membership to avoid further confusion on my part.

Other than course progression, I really cant fault SBL, if they introduced a learning plan/formal curriculum I would sign up again without any hesitation.

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Your dilema, @Allaboutthebass is a FAQ on SBL. There's tons of learning material there. These days they're categorised.

You can start with the Beginner lesson about bass familiarisation  and go on ...

Bass 101: The Anatomy of The Bass & Getting Started
Bass Guitar Foundations - The Definitive Guide
Functional Theory for Bassists Vol 1
Essential Groove Techniques
Technique Deep Dive for Bass

Each of these courses, alone, consist of 10x  30 minute lessons.  If you study each lesson in each course. The above courses could, if you really work on it, as you should, could take you over a year. Then you can go onto the next stages with intermediate stuff:

Harmonic Layering - Arpeggios, Chord Tones & Scales
A Masterclass in Time and Groove Development
The Bass Line Series: 10 Classic Bass Lines

The list goes on.

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2 hours ago, cgullcharlie said:

I have piles and piles of free tabs for every genre of music and if I just spend a few years learning all of those, surely that's the way to go as its all about songs at the end of the day?   Dont get me wrong I have the discipline and devotion to work through courses and lessons - its just that songs are the real thing.

@devinebass won't be stumped in the slightest.

Your collection of TABs is fine, if all you ever want to do is twist and mangle your fingers to re-create some other bedroom-warrior's interpretation of a great bassline. If you want to add your own fills, and chromatic runs etc., then it helps to understand what influence these will have on the overall feel. If you're playing a song and you're mainly playing A, D F#, G, then it throws in some Fs in there too. Isn't is useful to know why? 

If your front man is hogging the mic and talking away to the punters, isn't it  cool to keep playing a quiet bass line in the background, to keep the vibe going? Pros do that. But if you don't have a TAB for that, what will you do?

If you're putting together a montage and songs are the same rhythm, but in a different key, but you want to "walk" from one to the next is it better to do this, playing notes that fall into both Keys?

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I've just rejoined. I had a membership in the early days and didn't get enough out of it. Now I feel it has much more depth and I can access it. I learned to read as a kid and just forgot everything. I'm just completing the theory and sight reading lessons done by Philip Mann and its really working for me. I am very grateful for that. I work with some real muso's who are very patient with me but this is making a real difference. Well done to Scott.

 

 

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I'm seriously thinking of joining mainly to learn some theory.

I'm totally self taught & have been playing 39 years now,can play pretty much anything I put my mind to but when it comes to writing bass lines or fills or even a solo I struggle to play anything new/interesting.

Frankly I'm pretty bored with my own playing,the same old licks time after time,it feels like I hit a wall years ago.

I do get regular compliments on my bass playing at gigs etc' but I feel frustrated with myself so maybe it's time for some decent tuition.

Edited by artisan
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I joined SBL a couple of years back and took the lifetime offer when it came knowing I was retiring in 2019. As things have gone along I will actually be finishing work next week (yeah) so my use of the academy will grow out of all proportions.

It will be my excuse to the wife for not completing my daily chores (if you her of any husband beating cases in Staffordshire you will know who it is):D

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Basschat could do worse,  than finding a few members who are both capable and willing to film a regular tutorial to put up on here. A video version of the podcast which incorporates tutorials?

There's enough decent players here to make that happen?

@ped?

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1 hour ago, Rayman said:

Basschat could do worse,  than finding a few members who are both capable and willing to film a regular tutorial to put up on here. A video version of the podcast which incorporates tutorials?

There's enough decent players here to make that happen?

@ped?

I think that’s a great idea 👍

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