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Christine

The Twins

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10 hours ago, SpondonBassed said:

Lovely.

I want to get myself inlaid when I'm old enough.  Tattoos are old hat.

That reminded me of an old "Minder" show from years ago if you remember it? Arthur Daley's nephew came to work for in at the car lot and he had a swastika tattooed on his forehead so they had to stick a big round plaster over it, it was so funny :laugh1:

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43 minutes ago, fleabag said:

As good looking as any boutique basses out there, IMO.

Wish i had 50% of your skills Christine  :)

Thanks, that's very kind :) I hope it turns out OK at the end, even though I've made a few basses over the years I'm still very much a beginner at it; woodwork seems the least of it sometimes

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22 minutes ago, Christine said:

Thanks, that's very kind :) I hope it turns out OK at the end, even though I've made a few basses over the years I'm still very much a beginner at it; woodwork seems the least of it sometimes

If you don't have your woodworking skills I can assure you that woodworking is very much the most of it!

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1 hour ago, Christine said:

That reminded me of an old "Minder" show from years ago if you remember it? Arthur Daley's nephew came to work for in at the car lot and he had a swastika tattooed on his forehead so they had to stick a big round plaster over it, it was so funny :laugh1:

Minder, the nephew years?  I remember it.  If all the years that Dennis Waterman was in could be likened to cheese, the follow on nephew years were merely yoghurt.

I like the bass popping in the theme tune.

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Another hot morning in the sun cutting Abalone today, I cut a couple of the Draig inlays. After I drilled the headstocks for the tuners and marked and routed the holes for the inlays and stuck them in, not quite as easy as the square fretboard inlays and yes a little black epoxy was needed.

Just rough sanded and wetted to give an idea

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24 minutes ago, Christine said:

Another hot morning in the sun cutting Abalone today, I cut a couple of the Draig inlays. After I drilled the headstocks for the tuners and marked and routed the holes for the inlays and stuck them in, not quite as easy as the square fretboard inlays and yes a little black epoxy was needed.

Just rough sanded and wetted to give an idea

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Superb

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Did the second dragon today, I left a little more space between the pieces, I think it works slightly better. Will inlay it tomorrow, got a bit of a headache tonight after too much sun despite wearing an huge old floppy hat I found

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I set the last inlays in the other headstock today, looks good I think

Well that will be it now for a couple of weeks, we're off on holiday to the distant land of England. When I'm back it will be bind the headstock, cut the trussrod access slot and drill it's hole, Finish the neck tenon, fret the fingerboad fit the side dots and stick it on before carving the neck.

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3 hours ago, Woodinblack said:

Not sure if anyone asked, but why two?

Two reasons, I wanted to compare the two Rocklite fretboard materials side by side and I might be able to sell one to help fund the one I end up keeping

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Skilled with a spoke shave and smart business woman.  :)

 

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We're back off holiday so I had a few hours in the workshop today.

I routed the headstock for the truss rod access slot and then drilled the hole for the nut to fit into.The truss rods were fitted and a strip of masking tape put over then to stop glue getting in the slot and fouling the rods.

I rolled the frets to about an 8" radius, cut the wire into lengths and started trimming the ends with a grinding wheel in a Dremel, fiddly but it worked OK. I fitted the frets using a press and nipped off the ends. That was about it other than to make a clamping caul to protect the fretboard when I do eventually glue it to the neck which should be later this week daily life permitting :)

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The attention to detail is fabulous. They're going to be so good looking when they're

Looking forward to the next stage. No more holidays for you    get on with 'em   :i-m_so_happy:

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I'm off for another week at the beginning of August :laugh1: The joys of being retired :)

Thank you but there's still plenty of time for me to muck up yet

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Well today I screwed up a little, not a disaster just a set back:

I started off this morning by finishing off the tenons for the neck joints, so they're ready to glue now.

After that I turned to the head stocks for the binding, my first attempt at 3 ply binding, ah so you can see this coming :laugh1: First job was to create a form to bend and glue the 3 x 0.5mm binding strips together, so that was made from some MDF with foam double sided tape as a gasket sort of thing to keep an even pressure while the glue set (acetone actually). Next I cut the binding strips to size and warmed them and clamped them up in the jig and warmed them again, then I loosened the clamps one at a time and with a syringe applied some acetone to the bindings which welds them together and tightened them up while making sure they were bedded down properly and left them to set for an hour before finally taking them out, so far so good.

I measured the thickness of the finished laminate and it was 1.48mm, ideal I thought and routed the rebate in the headstock at 1.5mm and thankfully only at 4.5mm deep for the 6.25 binding strip. Next bit was to clean the bottom edge of the laminated strips, I did this by glueing a piece of 150 grit sandpaper onto a strip of plywood and sanded the bottom of the strip on that before cleaning off the inner corners. Finally it was glueing time so I put the strip in place and got some masking tape to hold it in place vertically with a bit left on top to flip over to hold it horizontally. I applied some thin CA and flipped the tape over and made sure the strip was well in and properly fitted.

So far so good and all looked well, after another hour I removed the masking tape and started to scrape the tops of the strip, it looked great, next was the turn of the sides, ah now here it is: What was pretty much dead flush was now sticking out proud by a fair bit, well spherical objects! I scraped away to get it flush and the entire cream outer laminate was removed, I wasn't happy, I may even have sworn but I can't really remember if I did or not LOL. All I could do was remove the glued in bindings but as they were reasonably consistent at 0.5mm proud I used a 2mm rebate 5mm deep to remove the. I didn't have any more binding so that's now on order and fingers crossed will be here Friday so at least I can get it done by the weekend.

Well that's something learnt, at least it only cost a little time and money not the whole neck (s). I'm not 100% sure what exactly happened yet, I'll measure up on Friday morning when I'm back in the workshop but I suspect it was the process of glueing with CA that has caused some sort of swelling. I didn't photograph the damaged sides, I was too cross so I'll leave that to you're imagination but just think a very tidy looking black banding instead of cream :)

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Sort of back in the workshop today, mostly waiting for the replacement binding to arrive but out postman was late as usual and didn't arrive until nearly 4pm so at least I can get that redone tomorrow.

What I did do was rout the recesses for the control cavity covers and made a former for the body bindings so I should get those done tomorrow too

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12 minutes ago, Christine said:

Sort of back in the workshop today, mostly waiting for the replacement binding to arrive but out postman was late as usual and didn't arrive until nearly 4pm so at least I can get that redone tomorrow.

What I did do was rout the recesses for the control cavity covers and made a former for the body bindings so I should get those done tomorrow too

IMG_5126.

A very professional approach.  This is the sort of stuff I skimp on...and it shows! :lol:

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7 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

A very professional approach.  This is the sort of stuff I skimp on...and it shows! :lol:

It's a case of I haven't done this before and I don't know another way of doing it yet, I'm learning tons on this build

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1 minute ago, pete.young said:

I hope you had a great holiday. I'm glad you're back though, I was beginning to get withdrawal symptoms!

Thanks, we did, with weather like that how could we not? I won't go far, I'm like a bad smell in a lift :laugh1:

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Really liking this thread! There's always things to learn and seeing different approaches taken to solving problems.

I'm still jealous of your workshop!!

Cheers

Jez

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12 hours ago, Jabba_the_gut said:

Really liking this thread! There's always things to learn and seeing different approaches taken to solving problems.

I'm still jealous of your workshop!!

Cheers

Jez

You would have loved my old workshops, two large old cowsheds converted and a third as a showroom/woodstore. we had a machine room and a separate bench room which was really comfortable apart from when someone used a router, EEK! The machinery was all 1950s Wadkin all re manufactured to as new condition and was stunning to use, very heavy solid cast iron and no vibration, talk about being spoilt :) A far cry from my apprenticeship days of hand planing 24" Elm boards from say 1 1/2" down to 1" in an old shed.

Lovely as it was I think what I have now is better suited to making basses, thankfully many of the skills I learnt as a furniture maker are transferable to guitar making or certainly the mechanics of it but there are a lot of things that are very different that I have yet to learn or gain some experience with. Thankfully this is only a hobby now and not a business otherwise I would be bankrupt in a month at the speed I'm working at. Like furniture making, anyone can make the stuff to a high standard but the real skill is in making it to that standard quickly, a pressure that thankfully isn't on me

Anyway, a picture of something I made a few years ago, sorry about the quality it's a photo of a photograph. The cabinet was quite big and made with shop cut 3mm veneers of Indian Rosewood and East Indian Satinwood with Sri Lankan Ebony for inlay stringing and glazing bars, the rope twists were hand carved from solid Rosewood

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