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Andyjr1515

A build for our own Len_derby

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Well - I'm out of excuses now...tomorrow is final sanding day and finishing starts at the weekend.

The last job was to set the bridge at its final height, and that allows me to see how much leeway I have for the final curve of the top.  It's not critical, but I would like the bridge plate to be at least partially sunken into the top and, ideally, flush.  It makes no difference to the functionality, but I want to avoid the look of some bridges where they appear to be a bit of an afterthought.

I used a Dremel precision router for the flatness and finished the edges with chisels.  Like the pickup routs, I did the curved front corners with a 5mm drill, drilled to final depth, before routing the bulk out :

l6aYSDSl.jpg

 

That gives me a nice close fit and looks like it is supposed to be there:

EzdBBSel.jpg

 

This done, it lets me pencil the 'flush level'...

GJrnlIRl.jpg

 

...so I can see how deep to sand.  The aim will be flush at the leading edge and curving down a touch to expose the bridge plate progressively towards the tailstock.

I'm hoping that the weather stays dry tomorrow as it is a lot easier to do the final sand outside - especially when looking for sanding marks, glue overspill and unwanted dints.  The Osmo has arrived so, all being well, I should be able to apply the first couple of sealing coats as well before the start of the weekend :)

 

 

Edited by Andyjr1515
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The end is in sight?

Neil will be struggling with "Is it done yet?" for the next few days....

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42 minutes ago, TheGreek said:

The end is in sight?

Neil will be struggling with "Is it done yet?" for the next few days....

Luckily I have a two-gig weekend that's going to keep me occupied.

Otherwise, like a poorly-trained spaniel, I'd be chewing up the furniture.

Seriously though, when I asked Andy to make me the bass the idea was always 'when it's done, it's done'. No time constraints. 

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5 hours ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Well - I'm out of excuses now...tomorrow is final sanding day and finishing starts at the weekend.

The last job was to set the bridge at its final height, and that allows me to see how much leeway I have for the final curve of the top.  It's not critical, but I would like the bridge plate to be at least partially sunken into the top and, ideally, flush.  It makes no difference to the functionality, but I want to avoid the look of some bridges where they appear to be a bit of an afterthought.

I used a Dremel precision router for the flatness and finished the edges with chisels.  Like the pickup routs, I did the curved front corners with a 5mm drill, drilled to final depth, before routing the bulk out :

l6aYSDSl.jpg

 

That gives me a nice close fit and looks like it is supposed to be there:

EzdBBSel.jpg

 

This done, it lets me pencil the 'flush level'...

GJrnlIRl.jpg

 

...so I can see how deep to sand.  The aim will be flush at the leading edge and curving down a touch to expose the bridge plate progressively towards the tailstock.

I'm hoping that the weather stays dry tomorrow as it is a lot easier to do the final sand outside - especially when looking for sanding marks, glue overspill and unwanted dints.  The Osmo has arrived so, all being well, I should be able to apply the first couple of sealing coats as well before the start of the weekend :)

 

 

The bridge set in like that looks a million dollars, such a difference over sat on top.

can I recommend if you ever have the space and spare cash a Festool Rotex sander and an externally controlled vacuum for it. They are great, no dust at all and can be super aggressive in direct drive for either shaping or getting a smooth flat surface and in orbital mode give a totally scratch free finish. Mine is over 25 years old now and has been hammered to near death but I would buy another tomorrow if I needed another sander, they are streets ahead of any other sander I've tried even of really difficult timber like burrs or flat sawn Ash which has an awful habit of turning into ridges and hollows 

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34 minutes ago, Christine said:

The bridge set in like that looks a million dollars, such a difference over sat on top.

can I recommend if you ever have the space and spare cash a Festool Rotex sander and an externally controlled vacuum for it. They are great, no dust at all and can be super aggressive in direct drive for either shaping or getting a smooth flat surface and in orbital mode give a totally scratch free finish. Mine is over 25 years old now and has been hammered to near death but I would buy another tomorrow if I needed another sander, they are streets ahead of any other sander I've tried even of really difficult timber like burrs or flat sawn Ash which has an awful habit of turning into ridges and hollows 

Great endorsement - I'll have a look :)

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10 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Great endorsement - I'll have a look :)

I didn't say they were cheap though! In fact the price looks painful but value for money, pay for itself in a very short time. Mine is an RO150 

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8 hours ago, Christine said:

can I recommend if you ever have the space and spare cash a Festool Rotex sander and an externally controlled vacuum for it.

 

8 hours ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Great endorsement - I'll have a look :)

 

7 hours ago, Christine said:

I didn't say they were cheap though! In fact the price looks painful but value for money, pay for itself in a very short time. Mine is an RO150 

 

7 hours ago, Jabba_the_gut said:

You’re right. Just had a look - they’re not cheap!!! 

So have I.  £433 was the cheapest on a quick search and that was an RO125.  Christine's RO150 is £508!

I've not looked at the specs to see what the differences between the two are because I can't justify the expense of the entry level one let alone what Christine recommends.  I might have to consider it however as I am getting a bit of interest locally for restored cast iron garden furniture.

Shameless thread diversion concealed below:

Spoiler

 

I've found Sapele to be an excellent timber for the job but using it rough sawn, I like to take the roughness off just a touch.  I've had a bench in for restoration so I'll see how sore my elbow is after I've done.

CastIronChairResto.png.07058234d4b614b40fdd2d3ce9756579.png

 

 

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Last post on this I don't want to derail Andy's thread. If you can't justify one that's fine, they are very expensive but they are exceptional at what they do which is smoothing wood either flat or curved but in the way you want to not the way the wood wants. 

Previosly I had bought Bosch and Elu sanders which didn't last 3 months in my workshop and spent more time back at the service centre either being replaced or repaired. Then the finished surface was at best a little wavy on flat surfaces, the Festool has the Rotex setting which is a halfway house between a random orbital and a disc sander. It cuts cleanly across the surface not following it removing high spots but in an almost scratch free way. I use that to 180 grit then switch to the random orbital mode for finishing with 240 or 320 on a bad day. And the best bit was it did it for over 20 years, only just recently did the switch give out and need to go back for repair, along with some new gears that I didn't know about, I think it has another 20 years in it now. 

I would recommend one for the standard of finish alone even if they only lasted one year, they are honestly that good

Edited by Christine
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Although the Festool is now firmly on my wish list (I have seen previous reviews and it is that halfway house that @Christine mentions that seems to be a pretty powerful USP), nevertheless it isn't in my present means so it's old-fashioned BF&I this time round.

Got the sanding pretty much done (prob still got the final, final neck work to do) and THE FINISHING IS STARTED :party:

Here it is in its sanded form:

TbEV99El.jpg

Not sure if it really comes off, but the figuring just behind the fretboard end always reminded me of the swift shape, so I tried to emulate it with the fretboard end carve:

iIpnJTwl.jpg

 

And then the first tru-oil slurry and wipe coats.  Unless I have a colour concern, I generally now use that for my base sealing and grain-filling process, whatever the final finish.  In this case the final finish is going to be Osmo Polyx satin, but I'll still start with the tru-oil treatment.  In a previous build, I proved to myself that you can slurry with Osmo just as well, but I wanted that touch of added amber hue that tru-oil tends to give:

jiLIbCkl.jpg

i4Mpvp1l.jpg

The bridge, by the way, is now flush with the leading edge of the body as planned:

nz6thjWl.jpg

 

Finishing progress shots tend to get a bit boring so I won't post the Polyx progress, suffice to say that I will be wiping it on with micro-fibre cloth.

All being well, the next shots - probably next week - should be the fully assembled bass :)

It will still need a week or so for the finish to fully harden before I can pass it across to Neil but I think I'm now fully clear of disaster/BBQ wood potential tasks - I think it's actually going to turn into a playable bass! :D

As always, many thanks for the encouraging feedback and pearls of wisdom along the way :)

 

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T'is indeed a thing of beauty and an inspirational thread too.

Now where did I put my chisels, I feel a whittle coming on !

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That bridge is a really nice touch.

Edited by SpondonBassed
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1 hour ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Although the Festool is now firmly on my wish list (I have seen previous reviews and it is that halfway house that @Christine mentions that seems to be a pretty powerful USP), nevertheless it isn't in my present means so it's old-fashioned BF&I this time round.

I've got the Festool ETS 125, which is an eccentric sander.  I'm not quite sure what the difference is between that range and the Rotex range that Christine has mentioned, but they are (a bit) cheaper and mine will very happily sand wood and polish finish up to 2000 grit (Andy my blue tele was finish-sanded with it).  I don't think it's really designed for taking off lots of material, but for normal sanding and finishing it works great.  Give it a go next time you are up?

Edited by honza992
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