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SpondonBassed

How Many Notes Does it Take to Make a Chord?

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Thanks to this thread I'm reading again, some 30 years later, Théorie de la musique by Adolphe DANHAUSER, and I'm enjoying it a lot, certainly more than 30 years ago. I'm also doing this to make sure that I didn't write any crap. I also now understand why I'm a fretless player rather than a fretted one : it's called the equal temperament. In fact, thanks to you all here, I noticed that I need to hear the natural harmonic note (as the third is always out of tune in the equal temperament), so I'm naturally correcting it on the fretless, and especially on chords I could play. This is again also why it took me years to appreciate the piano or even to some extent the guitar even if I've always been a great fan of Wes Montgomery, and now Radu Lupu that I had the opportunity to hear twice (solo and with orchestra) or Hiromi and of course the late Esbjörn Svensson and Oscar Peterson...

Thank you guys, really. :friends:

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42 minutes ago, Hellzero said:

 Wes Montgomery, Radu Lupu,  Hiromi, Esbjörn Svensson and Oscar Peterson...

It doesn't get any better than that lot. Terrific musicians !! 

But, you would have trouble selling their recordings at a UK Boot sale. :D

 

Not sure is you have seen this rare footage. Wes sitting in with an (excellent) Dutch trio back in the mid 60's.

 

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9 hours ago, Hellzero said:

So we have to show our degrees ? And next step will be IQ, I guess. Wow, coming from a philosopher, that's the most patronising answer ever, but as you have the two necessary degrees, may I ask you something that will involve the use the both of them ?

Can you prove and demonstrate us using mathematics and philosophy that "1 + 1 = 2"  ?

In computers, 1 + 1 = 10.

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52 minutes ago, Dad3353 said:

... or rather 102  :|

So, you have to establish the context of the question...

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The context is quite clear, I never mentioned digital (numeric on our side of the sea) counting... Mathematics and philosophy as it's written.

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14 hours ago, lowdown said:

It doesn't get any better than that lot. Terrific musicians !! 

But, you would have trouble selling their recordings at a UK Boot sale. :D

 

Not sure is you have seen this rare footage. Wes sitting in with an (excellent) Dutch trio back in the mid 60's.

 

Thanks a lot. I never saw it before. I guess you've heard the live in Europe of 1965, originally only 5 titles recorded by the RTB in one of their Brussels studio (Flagey I think) in very high quality ?

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It doesn't really matter imo, if you were following notation it tells you exactly what notes to play so there's no need to define it as BigRedX has hinted at,  if it's just a chord chart I see no harm in playing anywhere between nothing at all to all the available notes in the given chord. 

Edited by stingrayPete1977

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17 hours ago, bassace said:

147 replies so far. Come on guys, I’m sure we can get this pointless discussion up to 150 by the end of the day.

It might appear to be pointless if you think you have a comprehensive knowledge of music theory, but for the rest of us, asking "stupid" questions helps us to expand our base of information, and because we've endlessly asked "why", we are far more likely to retain this information in the future, than if we has simply learnt it by rote from a book or lesson. I think it is also good for those who do claim to have all the answers to question some of their musical theory beliefs.

AFAICS there still doesn't appear to be a definitive answer to the question of whether 2 notes alone are enough to be called a chord, the answer seeming to depend on which expert text you choose to reference. IME two notes are plenty - either any extra missing notes from the chord will be obvious from the musical context, or it won't matter at all.

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One band I  play with does a cover of Days by the Kinks, and I always end it with a two note root-third chord. I'm so proud of myself.   My one and only chord!!  I've been playing 7 years now and I'm really getting flashy :D  

  • Haha 1

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4 minutes ago, seashell said:

One band I  play with does a cover of Days by the Kinks, and I always end it with a two note root-third chord. I'm so proud of myself.   My one and only chord!!  I've been playing 7 years now and I'm really getting flashy :D  

Thanks.  I knew I wasn't the only one.

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on one of our own songs I finish it by playing all four strings open, wonder what chord that is? Em11?

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Just now, PaulWarning said:

on one of our own songs I finish it by playing all four strings open, wonder what chord that is? Em11?

Funny that.  I used to wonder if that was recognised as a chord myself.  I also used to wonder if I could find a previously unheard of chord by chucking a few choir boys off of varying heights of step ladder simultaneously but I haven't been able to test that one yet.

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50 minutes ago, PaulWarning said:

on one of our own songs I finish it by playing all four strings open, wonder what chord that is? Em11?

It is indeed

https://www.scales-chords.com/findnotes_en.php?n1=E&n2=&n3=&n4=A&n5=D&n6=G

 

You can see how a single chord even with three notes doesn't define the chord as clearly as some people here would have you believe, just that one example of eadg throws up multiple possibilities, of course if it was written down then you'd have the key signature and also no need to define anything because the notation would tell you the key and which notes to play, even a two note chord. 

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52 minutes ago, stingrayPete1977 said:

It is indeed

https://www.scales-chords.com/findnotes_en.php?n1=E&n2=&n3=&n4=A&n5=D&n6=G

 

You can see how a single chord even with three notes doesn't define the chord as clearly as some people here would have you believe, just that one example of eadg throws up multiple possibilities, of course if it was written down then you'd have the key signature and also no need to define anything because the notation would tell you the key and which notes to play, even a two note chord. 

That utility is great but incomplete because it doesn't seem to recognise quartal harmony. It assumes, along with 99.9% of musicians, that chords are based on stacked thirds (which is a reasonable assumption to make 99.9% of the time - but not 100% of the time!)

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