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ThePapabull

Your thoughts re: Flats on a Jazz bass?

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I'm really not trying to sound stoopid (or play Devil's advocate) but would appreciate your thoughts regarding putting flats on a jazz bass.

1.Is this taboo?

2.Can it work?

3.Does it make any sense?

4. Most importantly can i get that burpy sound from the the bridge pick up using flats?

Your thoughts would be VERY welcome

best wishes to all

paul h

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In order;
1 - No, it's a classic sound that's on many great records
2 - Yes, see 1.
3 - Again, yes
4 - Sort of. You can get a tight, punchy, middy tone that's very recognisably a jazz bridge pickup, though it stops slightly short of the full Jaco "parp". I prefer the flats version, personally.

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Wouldn't the first Jazz basses have come with flats as standard? Jazz Bass 1960, roundwounds 1966 from the quickest bit of Googling.

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It's definitely worth a try. Get a cheap set of flats like fenders own and give it a go. I used to when I was playing with a guitarist who played acoustic only, worked great.

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Louis Johnson used flats on his Musicman to start with. If that can work then flats on a Jazz will sound fine.

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Both my Jazz bases have flats on them (Chromes), I find it gets rid of the twangyness, which is a good thing from my point of view.

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Thanks all, really useful...... Going to give it a go. Not sure about string gauge but not too heavy. I tried a friends P bass strung with flats really liked the feel of them. That might sound daft but I think sometimes that kind of thing can affect how you play!

Anyway thanks for your help.....

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[quote name='ThePapabull' timestamp='1489834677' post='3260169']That might sound daft but I think sometimes that kind of thing can affect how you play!
[/quote]

Not daft at all. If you are confident in your sound then you'll be happy. A happy bass player is [i]always[/i] a better bass player.

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Flats sound great on a jazz. Remember your amp has a treble control so you can dial back in the top end but flats will give you a different version on that back pick up burp.

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Just got my first jazz bass (used). Came with flats on it so I got some bright round wounds to put on. Within a day the flats were back on it as they sounded better (and I always prefer the feel of them). For me the bridge pickup sound was better with flats.

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100% yes you can, they're great on a Jazz, personally I love the TI Jazz flats matched with a Jazz neck, to me they suit it perfectly. I wouldn't like the feel of my favourite P-bass flats on a skinny neck, horses for courses & all that. GHS Precision flats on a P with 1 3/4" nut = perfect, TI's on a Jazz = perfect.

Just my twopenneth :happy:

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Chromes work very well on my Jazz and have plenty of midrange growl when needed. I find rounds too clanky on a Jazz, which is already quite bright sounding.

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I had flats on mine and it sounded great. I put them on a Rickenbacker too. We need to stop having rules for music.

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THATS IT !!!! I'm doing it. Big thanks for everyones contribution here....... I've said it before but BASSCHAT is such am awesome community.. LOVE IT

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[quote name='Beer of the Bass' timestamp='1489784467' post='3259918']
In order;
1 - No, it's a classic sound that's on many great records
2 - Yes, see 1.
3 - Again, yes
4 - Sort of. You can get a tight, punchy, middy tone that's very recognisably a jazz bridge pickup, though it stops slightly short of the full Jaco "parp". I prefer the flats version, personally.
[/quote]

Yes! What he said...

Edited by lovetheblues

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TI Jazz Flats sound wicked on a Jazz Bass. Yes, they can affect the way you think and play but that is not a bad thing by any means.

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I haven't put flats on my passive Jazz, yet, but I have been playing my active Lakland 55-94 with flats for a little while and although it sounds pretty good, I think I prefer the "livelier" sound of a good set of rounds on an active bass.

The flats give the 55-94 the typical thump and fuller fatter sound, but the P bass does that even better. I guess that's down to it's pickup design and location.

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