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String Winds

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I think this might have been done before but I could not find a thread so started a new one

I was just wondering how many winds/wraps of string you guys like to put on the peg when changing strings I always make sure I get 2.5 winds around the tuning peg but have seen some basses with more some with less I would think to many and the string would jump off the peg and not enough would obviously mean no adjustment in tuning so just asking out of curiosity really :)

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I buy new strings, pop the end in the centre, then wind until it is in tune (always ensuring that it exits at the bottom of the coil)

I think that this method is BC heresy; I'm doing it incorrectly and my basses will go out of tune due to these superfluous windings. Except they don't, and never have.

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I cut about two inches off and wind what remains, exiting at the bottom of the capstan, so pretty much like you

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I cut some strings down and aim for 3 winds.

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If you're stringing a Fender style headstock with a string tree for the D and G strings then the number of winds on those two strings matters less. On E and A strings more winds gives a better break angle at the nut.

I put a new set of Pyramid Gold flats on my Lakland Decade last week:

E string = 6 winds
A string = 5 winds
D string = 4 winds
G string = 4 winds

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You want about 3, just so the string doesn't slip.

Don't wind the string over the string, keep it over the peg only.

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What is the distance between the E tuner and the D tuner on a Fender? About 3 inches? That's how long I cut the strings. Gives about 3 winds.

Also, you can leave a twist in the string when wrapping it around the tuning peg if the ball end is trapped in the bridge. I always free the string at the bridge before tightening it. I'm assuming this could be why I've never had a dud string.

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With string tree's as said above really does not matter, but at least 2.5 just to be sure of no string slip.

Without string trees it depends, as a rule at least 3.5 ive found works, however if the nut is not optimal for say a smaller gauge string 5 plus raps around the post will give a good break angle to stop rattling in the nut due to the increased down ward pressure.

Better to have more raps then cut too short and find that you don't have correct string break angle.

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With the cheap strings I've been using recently I just trim about 2" off the E string (on to Fender P and J) and use the whole string to wind on for the other three. Never bothered counting how many turns it actually is, guessing around 3? Not had any issues with them anyway, stay in tune fine, give even response and not broken one. That's about as much as I want from a string.

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As has been mentioned there's a few things to consider:
[b]1. String gauge.[/b]
Thicker strings need less winds on most tuners. I always want to see two full wraps or more on the post... but I undo the string and clip if overlapping starts to happen.

[b]2. Tuner type.[/b]
Haven't tried restringing a headless, or one of those fancy locking tuners (sperzel make 'em?) - what I do know is the regular fender tuners have big tuning posts which work great, while the smaller tuning pegs (like on my ibanez) are fiddlier to restring - especially with thicker, stiffer strings. If you switch out strings and want to reuse them, the smaller tuning pegs are much harder on the strings.

[b]3. headstock type (tuners and headstock).[/b]
A tilt back headstock (like an ibanez SR neck or a warwick) is very forgiving of variable break angle across strings - as long as there is a couple of winds it should work great. Fender type headstocks have little or no headstock angling - meaning winds can effect break angle hugely (doubling or tripling it depending on the tuner and the headstock). I find getting the string as low on the E and A tuning pegs a bit of a chore, but worth it. I usually don't need to clip the A string.

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I cut the string back so that it extends about 3" past the winding post before I start. This is "about right" for my Precision, but I've just got an Ibanez SR with smaller posts, and I ended up with more turns that I expected, so I might go for nearer 2" next time.

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[quote name='PlungerModerno' timestamp='1425919009' post='2712212']
As has been mentioned there's a few things to consider:
[b]1. String gauge.[/b]
Thicker strings need less winds on most tuners. I always want to see two full wraps or more on the post... but I undo the string and clip if overlapping starts to happen.
[/quote]
I said above that I had six winds on my Lakland Decade E string but it's actually seven winds - with no overlap.

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Ideally you want just enough string wrapped around the machine head post to hold it in place and no more. That usually works out at just over 2 full winds.

On a modern style machine head that works out at about 8 cm and on an older style with a thicker post about 9 cm.

However on basses with non-angled headstocks where the windings are required to get the right break angle over the nut you really want as many as you can fit on the post without the winds overlapping.

The reason you want want as few winds as possible is because this area of the string gives up it's excess elasticity more slowly than the unwound length which means that on a new set the more winds you have on the machine head the longer it will take for the string to become stable and stay in tune. Obviously if you are are going to fit a set of flats on your bass and leave them there for the next 10 years then a couple of extra days of tuning instability isn't really going to be a problem, but if you change your strings every week or more frequently then you might find that your basses never stay properly in tune because of the excess windings.

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I've never cut a bass string, I do the same as Roland Rock; bend the end to a right angle & stick it in the whole, tighten with the spiral going down, tune up, done. Never had any problems & have only needed to tune it once after the re-string (obviously I tune all the time for gigs & rehearsals but just once in the current sitting/when I'm just noodling at home).

Now guitar strings or ukulele strings - less simple.

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The luthier I go to told me to use 2, so I cut the strings so there`s 4 inches past the tuning peg.

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[quote name='xilddx' timestamp='1425942764' post='2712697']
I cut the string beyond the tuning post about to about the same length as the average penis.
[/quote]

We going with vintage or modern stats?

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[quote name='EBS_freak' timestamp='1425943725' post='2712714']
We going with vintage or modern stats?
[/quote]
Definitely modern. I learned it from a German bass manual.

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[quote name='Roland Rock' timestamp='1425945852' post='2712732']
That's ironic; once I cut my penis with a G string to something like the average length of a tuning post.
[/quote]

That is an unfortunate turn of events.

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[quote name='xilddx' timestamp='1425942764' post='2712697']
I cut the string beyond the tuning post about to about the same length as the average penis.
[/quote]

So that's short for the beat-up backup bass, and long for the exotic handcrafted beauty?

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