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TrevorR

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Posts posted by TrevorR


  1. [quote name='drTStingray' timestamp='1445582816' post='2892483']
    I've since found Alan Spenner played on all but three tracks on Avalon and him and the Wal bass is quoted as being partially responsible for the sound of Roxy in that era.

    Jealous Guy was a single and it sounds like Spenner on Wal on it.
    [/quote]

    Roxy Music had a lot of Wal players through its ranks. John Gustafson played all the bass on Siren (incl Love Is The Drug) on a custom built bass that Ian built for him in pre-Wal days. Spenner, of course, though most of the YouTube vids I've found of him with Roxy have him playing a fretless P bass (maybe he didn't want to expose it to the rigors of regular touring), Gary Tibbs got a JG while he was in Roxy...


  2. [quote name='TrevorR' timestamp='1445547658' post='2892398']
    Loads more info here if you're interested... [url="http://walbasshistory.blogspot.co.uk"]http://walbasshistory.blogspot.co.uk[/url]

    They came in a floral finish too... ;-)


    [/quote]

    [quote name='CamdenRob' timestamp='1445581780' post='2892472']
    Have you ever player one Trevor? or know anyone who has one?
    [/quote]

    I've sadly never played one myself. However, I know 4 people who have had them pass through their hands. Nik, of course. Then a guy called Chris Franklin who helped Pete sell Jethro Tull's John Glascock's for his widow. Then there is the current owner of the above - John Entwistle's bass - a lovely, lovely guy from Arizona called Mike Gutierrez who is a bass fan but also an expert memorabilia appraiser in the States. He also had a refinished JG which was beat up and in a horrible state until restored and resprayed in a blue burst. He passed that on to "Bassman Jaymi" (if you know his review vids0, who passed it on soon after. Not sure where it is now.

    I'd love to have the chance to play one, I'd love the chance to own one - well maybe the former will happen one day... I'm absolutely sure the latter wont! :-)

    There's very little documentation on them but I'm pretty sure that the switches are series/parallel switches like on the passive Pro basses. Don't know how the leather would age but it's a pretty robust material and if a bass is stored it'll be away from light and airborne oxidants it would be pretty well protected. If it was in constant use I would guess that the natural skin oils and regular cleaning agents if would come into contact with would act to preserve it... No idea. Talking off the top of my head. I know that John Gustafson used his two Pro basses pretty much exclusively up until he died. So they must have been robust enough if properly looked after.


  3. Yeah, not read The Talent Code but it sounds like a very similar premise to Malcolm Gladwell's eminently readable "Outliers" which promotes the 1000 hours theory. It uses the Beatles training in Hamburg and an example... The book does cite psychological research but digests it nicely in a pop psych manner. It's a few years old now so I guess that the neuroscience in this area has come along quite some way since then. The myelin production tie-in is an interesting twist as a physiological basis for the improvement gained from practice...


  4. [quote name='Naetharu' timestamp='1445519335' post='2892085']
    Beautiful artwork - it was stuff like this that first got me into music. As a little kid of around 6-7 years old I took to collecting prog-rock vinyls not because I had a clue about the music but rather because the art in the album covers just seemed amazing. In addition the YES albums the others that really stand out in my memory are On the Threshold of a Dream by The Moody Blues and TARCUS by ELP. Amazing artwork and a great conduit into the music, at least for me.
    [/quote]

    Yup, my wall at university... DSotM prism poster on one wall, Yes Drama cover poster on the other...


  5. [quote name='CamdenRob' timestamp='1445510824' post='2891986']
    Am I really the only one that would use a P bass for rock covers? I'd want to be using the bass 90% of the songs I was replicating were recorded on.
    [/quote]

    Never been part of the equation for me. In a covers band I'm not trying to replicate a song, I'm trying to perform it. There is a huge difference. Replication is what Tribute bands are about. Line up limitations mean you could hardly ever replicate anyway. If we're playing Sweet Home Alabama or Hotel California with a band whose line up is ac/elec guitar, bass, drums and sax (our line up) then whether you're using the same bass as the original recording is going way beyond splitting hairs...

    As a concession though, one time we did an open air 1960s themed event I brought along my Frankenjazz but more for visual vibe than anything else...


  6. [quote name='toneknob' timestamp='1445512175' post='2892004']
    He's great (Relayer is my favourite), but in the ultimate prog album cover showdown, Hipgnosis wins.
    [/quote]

    Good point, well made. Aren't we fortunate that we had Storm for the techno, spacey, dystopian prog bands and Roger for the hippy, trippy prog bands. I went to a lecture a few years ago given by Roger and Storm (he was very clearly not a well man at the time) and they stood up well to their stereotypes. Storm was a charmingly curmudgeonly and capricious tease, Rog was a total hippy. They each talked about their work and the thought process behind it. Fascinating evening. So sad that Storm passed away a few years ago.

    Interesting though that Storm/Hipgnosis ventured into design for so many other styles of music whereas Roger's quintessentially architectural/fantastical eye kept him more in the purely prog arena of design.


  7. [quote name='CamdenRob' timestamp='1445496643' post='2891828']


    Yes BC has become a bit of a Wal fest recently... Even I as an ardent fanboi am running out of things to say about them!

    BC goes through phases like this though, it'll be another brand next week we're all talking about and Wal will fall into the background for a bit.
    [/quote]

    And to be fair David, a lot of the current Wal based activity HAS been sparked and fuelled by your posts... :-)


  8. [quote name='CamdenRob' timestamp='1444892365' post='2886968']


    The only time an esoteric bass like a Wal is any use is if you have the freedom to be using something that sounds a bit different. It wouldn't be any good for dad rock pub covers and neither would it be any use if you joined an established band with a certain image and sound they wanted you to continue. I only play bass in bands where I have total control of what I am playing and how it sounds, so I can get away with having a different tone to the extablished norm. I just play what I like with a tone that I think works for my style of playing.


    [/quote]

    No Rob, I don't get that at all. I've always found my Wals to be hugely versatile and able to fit into any playing situation. That includes playing folk, pop/rock/soul covers, rock musicals and modern worship. I've never really found a situation where I couldn't dial in a sympathetic or appropriate tone. The covers band I used to play in covers a wide range of styles from Britpop to Motown, Beatles to Laurel Canyon singer songwriter, rock to easy listening, rock and roll to white reggae. I was able to dial up all sorts of tones from varying pickup blend and tone settings, plucking position and whatever. At one wedding we did a kid came up after one of the sets asking what effects I was using. He really liked the different tones I was getting. The only pedals I had were a Boss TU2 tuner and a Lehle [email protected] switching pedal to switch between my two basses. All the different sounds were just from altering pickup choice, tone settings and playing technique.

    Lots and lots of different gig friendly sounds hiding inside a Wal when you know where to look for them..


  9. [quote name='Jus Lukin' timestamp='1444818540' post='2886288']


    ...That distinctive and and rich growl is something I can mentally recall to this day. It was thoroughly inappropriate for 90% of the material he was playing, but it was one hell of a tone...

    That 'All Growl' tone would be very useful as part of a toolbox of basses but, even as a player by trade, the cost would outweigh the benefits for me...

    [/quote]

    Imported from an entirely different thread but it seemed aposite over here too...

    [quote name='Bilbo' timestamp='1445421669' post='2891294']
    I am doing a Rock Blues gig with a Wal fretless next Tuesday that is going out live on local radio. The drummer is Brendan O'Neill, ex-Rory Gallagher, and it's going to be 'kin loud :lol: Anyone who thinks Wal's are one trick ponies is a eejit. Mine has done Jazz, Latin, Rock, Funk, Blues, Pop, Big Band, pit orchestra work live, studio etc etc. I have never had a negtative comment and have had plenty of positive ones. Wals deliver. End of.
    [/quote]

    Yes, that's another strange Wal bass urban myth that you hear lots. "Well, Wals great for that growl thing they do but I wouldn't want that sound all the time and they're a bit of a one trick pony." Inexplicable.

    Well, of course I can dial up a Wal growl tone on my Mk1 (and I find that the real growl seems to reside more in left hand technique than anywhere else) but they're so much more versatile than that. However, I've never found a situation where I couldn't dial in a sympathetic or appropriate tone. The covers band I used to play in covers a wide range of styles from Britpop to Motown, Beatles to Laurel Canyon singer songwriter, rock to easy listening, rock and roll to white reggae. With the Wal filter based controls I never had a problem finding a perfect sound for each song. The changes in tone derived from a whole mix of different factors - pickup blend and tone settings, how hard I attached the strings, plucking over the bridge pickup or neck pickup or over the end of the fingerboard.

    I recall one wedding gig where for the first two sets I had noticed a late teenage boy watching my playing very intently. After the second set he came over, said he was a bass player and asked what those effects pedals that I was using to get all those different sounds were. I looked down at my feet... They were a Boss TU2 tuner and a Lehle [email protected] which I was using to switch between basses. That's it. All the tonal shifts were from altering pickup choice, tone settings and playing technique.

    If you listen to a range of Wal players they achieve a huge range of tones. Laurence Cottle on the album Gaudi (Alan Parsons Project) sounds smooth and round and, while still retaining a certain Walness is a gazillion miles away from Flea's BSSM tone or Geddy's Power Windows sound. If there is one thing that a Wal is not, it's a tonal one trick pony...


  10. [quote name='Bilbo' timestamp='1445421669' post='2891294']
    I am doing a Rock Blues gig with a Wal fretless next Tuesday that is going out live on local radio. The drummer is Brendan O'Neill, ex-Rory Gallagher, and it's going to be 'kin loud :lol: Anyone who thinks Wal's are one trick ponies is a eejit. Mine has done Jazz, Latin, Rock, Funk, Blues, Pop, Big Band, pit orchestra work live, studio etc etc. I have never had a negtative comment and have had plenty of positive ones. Wals deliver. End of.
    [/quote]

    Yes, that's another strange Wal bass urban myth that you hear lots. "Well, Wals great for that growl thing they do but I wouldn't want that sound all the time and they're a bit of a one trick pony." Inexplicable.

    Well, of course I can dial up a Wal growl tone on my Mk1 (and I find that the real growl seems to reside more in left hand technique than anywhere else) but they're so much more versatile than that. However, I've never found a situation where I couldn't dial in a sympathetic or appropriate tone. The covers band I used to play in covers a wide range of styles from Britpop to Motown, Beatles to Laurel Canyon singer songwriter, rock to easy listening, rock and roll to white reggae. With the Wal filter based controls I never had a problem finding a perfect sound for each song. The changes in tone derived from a whole mix of different factors - pickup blend and tone settings, how hard I attached the strings, plucking over the bridge pickup or neck pickup or over the end of the fingerboard.

    I recall one wedding gig where for the first two sets I had noticed a late teenage boy watching my playing very intently. After the second set he came over, said he was a bass player and asked what those effects pedals that I was using to get all those different sounds were. I looked down at my feet... They were a Boss TU2 tuner and a Lehle [email protected] which I was using to switch between basses. That's it. All the tonal shifts were from altering pickup choice, tone settings and playing technique.

    If you listen to a range of Wal players they achieve a huge range of tones. Laurence Cottle on the album Gaudi (Alan Parsons Project) sounds smooth and round and, while still retaining a certain Walness is a gazillion miles away from Flea's BSSM tone or Geddy's Power Windows sound. If there is one thing that a Wal is not, it's a tonal one trick pony...


  11. [quote name='Bilbo' timestamp='1445421669' post='2891294']
    I am doing a Rock Blues gig with a Wal fretless next Tuesday that is going out live on local radio. The drummer is Brendan O'Neill, ex-Rory Gallagher, and it's going to be 'kin loud :lol: Anyone who thinks Wal's are one trick ponies is a eejit. Mine has done Jazz, Latin, Rock, Funk, Blues, Pop, Big Band, pit orchestra work live, studio etc etc. I have never had a negtative comment and have had plenty of positive ones. Wals deliver. End of.
    [/quote]

    Hallelujah! Preach it, brother!


  12. ...and look and play and feel.

    In an attempt to counter the recent levels of Wal-focused negativity which has been in these 'ere parts over the last week I thought I would post up some examples of the glorious sound which these amazing basses make. As part of theWal History talk I did at the SE Bass Bash recently I put together a brief playlist of examples of Wals record. Anyway the devil makes work for idle hands so this, naturally, grew into a bit of a mixtape.

    So anyway, to redress the balance here is a YouTube playlist featuring some classic Wal tones and some top Wal players. Enjoy...

    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLGIYNBxcSZ3uo0Dv4GUoVf-4yKXu7xmKT

    And for some further listening pleasure a somewhat different and longer Spotify playlist to soundtrack your day...

    https://open.spotify.com/user/11166282603/playlist/0MOUCZomh0RzYPQjndREOU


  13. [quote name='Roland Rock' timestamp='1445241028' post='2889748']
    I'd view it as an honour. Look at some of the othe top class musicians who have been guests on the show
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZingZillas
    [/quote]

    I watch it with my little one and am always amazed at the quality of musos they have on.... Nicola Benedetti, Simon Mayor, Julian Lloyd Webber, Dame Evelyn Glennie, Michael , BJ Cole, Gossip (!) (twice!!)... To name but a few. Hardly a bunch of artists on their uppers!


  14. There is also the question of what types of sound tend to sound pleasant to the human ear and which tend to sound unpleasant. I recall reading a fascinating article many moons ago (probably in the context of amp and speaker sims) about the effects that adding amp or effect pedal distortion has on the waveform. To my recollection it talked about how was well as clipping the wave it added numerous clipped higher harmonics - both even and odd. The combination of these caused a dissonance in the complex timbre of the note which is generally deemed unpleasant. Hence a fuzz box straight into a PA tends to sound pretty pants.

    However, the low fi nature of a guitar speaker, by happy accident, tends to filter out the ?odd? harmonics leaving a much more pleasant sounding set of harmonics within the wave form. It is this selective filtering which amp/speaker sims seek to emulate. I wonder whether this is also an element in what types of sound we find musical albeit perhaps in less exaggerated form than with a distorted guitar signal? I wonder how the harmonic content of a beautifully played and screechy violin note compare?


  15. [quote name='dincz' timestamp='1445244080' post='2889781']
    Slightly off track. I've often heard of different keys expressing different "moods". With the tempered scale, surely transposing from one major (or minor) key to another major (or minor) key would not affect the "mood".
    [/quote]

    Unless you transpose to D minor which, as we all know, is the saddest of all possible keys.


  16. Well there's interesting... Finally got round to weighing my Wals (after nigh on 15-20 years of playing them!). Both were about 10.2 lb/4.6kg - neither of which have ever seemed unduly heavy or unbalanced to me provided they've got a nice wide, comfy leather strap attached. Then, I weighed my Aria SB700 (my first ever bass). It was also almost exactly the same weight.

    So I guess the moral of the story for me is that I've never known any different. 10 lbs is just what a bass weighs in my experience! Thank heavens for a wide leather strap and a good osteopath, though!


  17. [quote name='DavidMcKay' timestamp='1445204280' post='2889650']
    [color=#000000][font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]I wasn't asking for anything other than A or B.[/font][/color]

    [color=#000000][font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]As my old English teacher was fond of saying to the class, "Doesn't matter how good you think you answer is if you fail to answer the question."[/font][/color]
    [/quote]

    Nope, perfectly valid answer. Which one would you go for? Neither, don't find either aesthetically pleasing and both have red flag features whether it's the single pickup on one or the maple fingerboard on the other. That counts both out for me.

    And in answer to the inevitable challenge - but if I said "Here, you could have either for free!" then which one would you go for? It would purely be the one with the higher resale value - and that's REALLY not the question you're trying to answer!

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