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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/04/21 in all areas

  1. Got to say a huge thank you to @alyctes who has just dropped off so much stuff for me to pass on to schools and clubs. I just can’t say thank you enough Jon
    14 points
  2. Just picked her up from Bass Direct. Light as a feather, sounds like thunder. Over the moon is an understatement!
    13 points
  3. My '73. Bought in 1990 from Boogie Music IIRC. Done thousands of gigs on this. Light, perfect sound, everybody who plays it, loves it. A real players guitar too. I will sell it when I retire from playing although that won't be for a while yet (I'm 52) Always love to post a picture of the old girl
    7 points
  4. *** NOW SOLD *** For sale is my gorgeous Limelight 1960 Stack Knob Fretless Jazz bass in Sherwood Green with medium relic. I had this made by Mark at Limelight to my specifications. As with all Limelight basses it sounds and plays beautifully. Details are, Unlined Ebony Fretless neck 38mm nut width. Hand rolled finger board. Aged nitro finish on the neck. Parchment scratchplate. Gotoh Vintage reverse tuners. Aged finish in nitro-cellulose. Lightly tarnished metal work. Stack knobs. Earth grounding strip from bridge to bridge pick up. Mute holes. Thumb Rest (Below strings). Hootenanny button on the back of the headstock. Period correct Fender logo. Weight 4.3kg Limelight make wonderful replica Fender basses and this one is no exception. Sounds and plays beautifully. It's very hard to photograph Sherwood Green as in some photos it looks green and in others it looks blue. So the last photo is next to a blue pot and a green pot which helps show the true colour of the bass. I paid £1123 for this at the start of 2020 and it has never been gigged or even left the house. Price is £750, based in Camberley, Surrey and UK shipping included. Would consider trades for the following, Fender Precision American Vintage Reissue 62 or 57 in Sunburst or White with cash your way. Fender Precision American Standard 2008 onwards (high mass bridge, lightweight Hipshot tuners and knurled chrome flat-top controls) in Sunburst with Rosewood neck. Fender American Performer Precision.
    4 points
  5. SOLD Hello, here comes a real Black Pearl with all the bells and whistles ... No scratches, dents or other damage. On the pictures are partly dust particles to see, these are not paint damage. Ritter Roya 5 String #1130 Alder body Maple neck Ebony fingerboard (stabilized) with blue side LED Ritter triple bucker and slimbucker Ritter Electronic (18 Volt): volume, blend, bass, treble, highmid, lowmid weight ca: 3,8kg New price: 6.500 GBP Absolutely low string action - really one of the best I had under my fingers so far. Special features strings through body - which I have never seen on a Ritter. Side dot LEDs - switchable through the passive tone blend (push/pull) Ritter F4 electronics with volume (push/pull active/passive), blend, passiv tone blend, treble, bass, lowmid, highmid How it sounds, you can hear in the following youtubes (all recorded at home with GarageBand. Bass directly into a Scarlett Solo. Compressor and EQ (Garage Band). https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhn9BoVRBA8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkSLvmXM2y0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tp1amaFmT68 I will be happy to answer any questions. You can also contact Jens directly. More pictures on request. Recordings of the bass only - on request. Testing anytime in Mainz (Germany) Last but not least. Shipping within the EU is no problem. To Great Britain after you've Brexit the party, I really don't know, but we can find out. I won't answer best price questions. If you are interested feel free to make a serious offer ...
    4 points
  6. Makes Mr Phillips' creations look like Alembics...
    4 points
  7. Summoned as I am by an upper-case challenge, a full reply might settle this non-argument. 1. I don't care about his money one way or another. I don't really care about my money either, but a taxi driver often does and I do care about getting where I need to be without worrying about being late. My point: sometimes money represents intangible, unquantifiable aspects of life. 2. I don't care if he's a git. I'm not asking him to join me for dinner. If he treats people badly, that reflects poorly on him (as it does on anyone), but after all the lyrics for "Yesterday" aren't "Yesterday/Hurry up with my sandwich you grotty nobody". Most listeners aren't going to experience that side, they merely hear the music. 3. Taste is subjective but also indicative. When a lot of people share a taste, there might be any number of reasons for that. I'm interested in the reasons, which are complex, rather than in the subjectivity of aesthetic responses, which is obvious but unlikely to shed light on anything. 4. I don't care about popularity or lionisation except as phenomena. What I like isn't especially popular except when it is. Popularity would be a meaningless measure of anything I do, except when it isn't. Being lauded and being popular only overlap sometimes (cf. thread on Banksy). McCartney's popularity in 1964, or 1980, are less interesting to me than his durability as an exponent of musical genres that are not as fleeting and short-lived as their commercial dimensions suggest they might be. 5. My subjective view? Well, okay. I formed my initial musical tastes in popular music from whatever Radio 1 played throughout the 1970s. That included some truly impressive moments (Bowie, Roxy Music, Slade at their most cheerful, Elvis Costello at his most acerbic, etc). There was much dross, of course; there always is. The Beatles remained popular and got played a lot; their stuff just worked like all the other stuff to my ahistorical ears. I knew it was "old" (i.e. not made last month), but I liked it anyway. So, lesson in the obvious for the young 'un: catchy songs endure. And McCartney was responsible for quite a lot of them. Wings didn't impress in the same way but did confirm that he was still in the game. McCartney II came out in 1980 with "Coming Up" on it. It isn't Bowie with "Fashion" or some similar display of acute musical antennae, but it does reveal a musician with a taste for incorporating new-found elements into his own work simply because he likes them and thinks he can use them. Another lesson: things change, and open-mindedness applies in all directions. I could like PiL, Madness, and "Coming Up" at the same time -- and then find Macca's Christmas single silly but oddly catchy. I saw that I might not be his audience for everything, but there is more than one audience. He is a populariser; including rather than excluding. Does he do it to make money? Sure. Does he only do it to make money? Of course not. He's having fun, and that comes across the way even a mediocre film can be elevated by an ensemble that is obviously having a whale of a time. And this was significant for me, an anxious child who quite obviously overthinks everything. Sometimes, having fun is a virtue in itself. I went back to the Beatles and listened property. It's like nothing else and everything else: a wide range of musical antecedents transmuted into songs realised at such a clip that they retain their spontaneity. They are seldom overworked. Many people deserve credit -- George Martin being the one everyone points to -- but McCartney is certainly crucial. Studio experiments; harmonies that evoke pre-modern chants; a transatlantic gumbo of styles worn lightly; and energetic performances from a band that was learning as they went, and which quickened the transition from studio as venue to studio as laboratory. Listening to the Beatles in the early 1980s was an education in itself. In 1981 I was teased for it by the kids who in 1989 were in love with it. Lesson: massive popularity does not preclude artistic validity. Were the Beatles a literary phenomenon, that artistic merit would be less clouded by the stigma of adolescent adulation. What do I find exciting and moving about his music? To be honest, I am lukewarm about most of his post-Beatles music, with a few exceptions, but I respect what he does with it. I respect the fact that an overpetted moptop still has the urge to form an ambient techno group with Youth. I respect the fact that he is obviously inclined to be a crowdpleaser until he drops, like he's Tony Bennett. But exciting and moving? Well, I associate Abbey Road, the last thing the Beatles recorded, with the frenzied, intoxicated lovemaking that characterised the breakdown of my first serious relationship. It's the sound of something that knows it is dying but is compelled to pretend otherwise, the sound of emotional demolition. I associate the guitar solo of "Taxman" with the transition of my taste -- and, crucially, the personal values that taste signifies -- toward the kind of jagged loss of self that I still try to invoke when I play the guitar to try to stay halfway willing to live. I hear in McCartney's bass playing a path through my own musical limitations as I pick up the four-string after 40 years with six thin ones. But, if were are going to get close to the bone, so be it: in the hours before my wife died, I played her six tracks. Five of them were mine. The other was "Things We Said Today". If you can write a song that captures so sweetly the sense of love beyond the reach of communication, you deserve McCartney's money, but I'll lay odds you can't. I question the premise that we can draw a general rule from your own subjective dismissal of a musician because he was unkind to you and you don't like plutocrats.
    4 points
  8. Whatever I do to straighten the neck, the headstock section has to be rejoined. Always a bit dodgy to add to the thread before you know the result, but it wouldn't be an Andyjr1515 thread if we weren't tip toeing on the very edge of disaster, would it! Normally, a scarf joint would be clean sanded and joined before the neck was carved so the clamps are sitting on flat cauls. Clearly that can't be done here. So the cunning plan is this: To take the neck profile either side of the joint: Carve a block with the shape and taper and check it for fit: Then, protecting the blocks from the glue with masking tape, apply a thin layer of Titebond to both surfaces and slide the joint together to interlock the grain break lines and line up against the break pattern and hold the carved block along the joint: Then, finally, add a flat top block and clamp until it's fully cured (basically, overnight): The visible joint at the back of the neck isn't going to be pretty, but the name of the game here is to get a strong, sturdy and straight joint. The neck will need to be stripped and refinished whatever and so I can tidy up the visible joint line at the time Oh...and if it isn't strong and sturdy and straight, then I'll have to break it open and do it again. But then again, you'd be disappointed if there wasn't a precipice I was walking backwards towards
    4 points
  9. I always like to have the physical bridge to hand when I am working out the bridge position and neck angle. This way I can check the actual and usable range of saddle height and intonation movement. I then draw the fretboard height, fret height, nut height full-size as a side view to the previously drawn plan view of the bass and plot the string run from nut to saddle at it's lowest set action height: I then match that against the saddle height range of the bridge to work out what, if any, the neck angle needs to be to allow the saddles to be able to have reasonable adjustability once it's all assembled: And this says that, in fact, I shouldn't need a neck angle. Which is, as it happens, a decent double check to what I had assumed. Why? Because the hipshot B-style is a modern take for the Fender BBOT...and Fender basses also generally do not need a neck angle. So when the neck splices arrive on, presumably Tuesday (unless UPS are delivering today), I should be able to make a burst of decent progress
    4 points
  10. Another reluctant sale to raise fund. A beautiful Yamaha BB2024 in very good condition. Comes with brand new Hiscox case that fits perfectly. Weighs 4kg - light weight for a BB2024.
    3 points
  11. Sold One nice 1987 EBMM 2 band eq Stingray with Spider hard case. Plays and sounds as you would expect. As per this era the neck is gloss finish, truss rod adjustment is at the headstock and the battery cover is silver. This is a players bass, it’s in good condition for a 34 year old instrument but it does show signs of life on the road. For comparison a Fender Road Worn shows much more wear & tear. As such I’ve priced this accordingly, pristine examples go for a lot more! The pic showing the wear on the back of the neck is around 7th to 9th fret. Weight is 4.75kg or 10lbs7oz Due to many threads detailing courier nightmares it’s collection/meet up only. No trades thanks.
    3 points
  12. £200 neck.. £100 pickup... Triggers Broom?
    3 points
  13. I think these stories abound about so many celebrities /notable people... I'm a life-long Bowie fan and these days, since his passing in 2016, it's hard to find anyone anywhere going to print (so to speak) being critical of his personality. But there are plenty of stories about what an insufferable ego manic he was during long phases of his career - particularly the 1970s... Knowing all that about Bowie doesn't change my opinion about his musical/artistic output, though I suspect if I'd met him and he'd been nasty or rude to me personally, I might feel differently. I'm with @Dad3353 in knowing full well that the world wouldn't miss any of my songs - hell, they don't even know about them anyway thankfully! But I think that the numbers infer that there literally are millions of people who would miss a fair number of McCartney's songs if they were somehow to be withdrawn from the Earth's pop music playlist.
    3 points
  14. You could inlay "Yes, you are too loud" in there. You know that it would ALWAYS be useful, no matter what band you were playing with.
    3 points
  15. Here she is! I’ve got a new set of D’addario Chrome flatwounds so I can restring them fretless side EAD. If I had bigger hands I’d be able to solo at the top of the fretless board, but that was never my plan anyway: the bottom 3 are going to be used for proper bass (and maybe the odd midrange excursion). the tone off those fretless strings really is quite striking! I’ve taken the thumb rest off: I don’t use them, and it just got in the way - hell of a job getting it off!
    3 points
  16. I have a few gigs trickling tentatively into the diary, and one is a dep slot for my old Madness Tribute. I've got over my bruised pride that they are still going strong without me, and am rather looking forwrd to it. It's at the Llanelli Festival, only a couple of days beyond the alleged end of restrictions - so still very theoretical. Nonetheless I have been studiously relearning everything, and transcribing all the bass parts, it has kept me busy. I got to thinking about the really important stuff today. What bass to take? Obviously I have my two toned precision, which will make a great prop/2nd bass but I wonder what the man mr Bedford himself used. Wouldja believe it theres a five year old thread here where someone points out that he was using a Bruce Thomas Profile - and I , of course, have that very bass in my collection. A good omen? Maybe I shall be blowing the cobwebs from my passport and heading over the bridge in June after all. Now, what hats did he wear....
    3 points
  17. Sorry, but that’s complete b0110cks, just 1980s NME-esque pop music snobbery that dismisses anything that has sold more them 100,000 copies as ‘elevator music’. Mr Brightside is a half-decent pop rock anthem that people who love music (but don’t obsess about it) can sing along to. There are so many urban legends about Sinatra that it’s hard to keep track. Who knows, some of them might even be true, but it is unlikely to be this one!
    3 points
  18. May sound like that now but the Killers track (which is way out ahead in this list) was energetic, edgy and anthemic when it came out, for a certain demographic. Not muso stuff, but neither were [insert your iconic band of choice].
    3 points
  19. That's a list of bland average news. Nothing but elevator music. The only one of them that has really contributed to the future of music was Sinatra and that was accidental. He used his mafia connections to get all rock gigs shut down in Palm Springs so the bands started having generator party's in the desert and Stoner Metal was born thanks to Frank. The other bands are just music for people who aren't interested in music. The peak of mediocrity.
    3 points
  20. Your disagreement is noted. Obviously, all posts of this kind make assertions. You might notice that I do not say McCartney necessarily meets the critieria I mention, merely that I offer possible reasons why (a) some think he is great, and (b) others really do not. In that sense, I am not asserting facts. I am merely proposing criteria in relation to an inherently critical topic. It is up to you, or to anyone, to judge for yourself whether you think McCartney is one of those musicians who meets the criteria I set out in the first sentence. Obviously, you do not, but I don't have any sense of whether you think the yardsticks themselves are invalid. Second sentence, regarding noteworthy technique, by now has a critical consensus that appears robust. That is about historical significance more than technique per se, of course. Third sentence about virtuosity is, again, a stipulated critical perspective, widely shared by aficionados of popular music (and acting, visual art, literature etc) regarding all but the most strictly formalised modes of creativity. (It is also why it is pointless to compare classical performance with improvised jazz, for example.) But the notion that the world would not miss a single one of his songs seems a little far-fetched, given that they still sell and it is not hard to find enthusiasts young enough to be McCartney's great-grandchildren. This is ultimately a commercialised form of music we are talking about. He doesn't need to be Mozart. I don't rate him as an artist the way I rate numerous other well-known figures. But I don't think his longevity and appeal are any great mystery. Craftsmen also endure. As much as the Beatles were more than the sum of their parts, perhaps McCartney is one of those artisans who is more than the sum of his abilities. Whether he bores you or not, I assume you would agree that not everyone shares your view. I am more interested in the structure of his appeal to those who like his work, because an individual's boredom doesn't really need explication if it provides no general rule. If McCartney bored everyone, your boredom would be interesting. As it is, it is a matter of taste, and I completely respect that. He might be a git. He might be a git sometimes. He might be a git to you. Does it really matter? A gobby taxi driver who gets me to Heathrow in record time still gets a big tip from me.
    3 points
  21. I've just stumbled across this little gem for use in your Computer Browser (or phone/tablet/laptop etc). It's just a String section arranged in triads. No extended chords. But it's quite useful when away from your instrument for putting chord sequences and scratch ideas together. You can then download as an Audio or Midi file for use in your DAW. The Epic Online Orchestra 1) Just click on a chord for chord sound. 2) Simple or advanced sequence mode. 3) Change tempo and save as a DAW song file. From from what I can make out (apart from the tempo change), this is just for Studio One. 4) Various style demo chord sequences 5) Click on a chord and this will insert into line #6 for making up your sequence. 7) Functions. 'Export' is for downloading as a Midi or Audio file for importing into your DAW or whatever you use..
    2 points
  22. I'm Vin, and I'm crap at bass! Live in Bristol, originally from Stoke. Into punk/hardcore/post-punk/post-hardcore and 90s alt rock. Technically been playing 20 years, but for most of that I didn't have a bass, so I don't think it counts. I only picked it up again a year or so ago. Hoping to do a band when it's safe. Never learned to play anyway. Just like making noise. I like short scale basses, cuz my back and my fingers are knackered. My rig consists of a Fender Mustang (PJ), a Portaflex, a Fender Rumble 210 Cab, and a minimalist pedalboard with an emphasis on grindy, nasty grit. Nice to be here, to be here...
    2 points
  23. I presume that's a short scale is it? 😄 Lovely DJ bass though, GLWTS!
    2 points
  24. Welcome aboard! There isn't a sub forum called "BassCrap", but if there was there would be a lot of us on there! But it's fun improving, however slowly.
    2 points
  25. Mr Brightside is a really good anthemic pop rock tune that has engaged many punters. Whether it is to your taste is neither here nor there, but you should be able to appreciate it for what it is. In a world of formulaic manufactured pop cr*p that has dominated the charts for the past 20 plus years, I actually find it quite encouraging that a genuine rock song heads that list. I think that is well known that Sinatra wasn’t a big fan of rock and roll in general, but to be honest I doubt that he would have been too bothered about heavy metal in particular. It is likely that HM wasn’t considered to be really the kind of entertainment that would appeal for the general clientele in Palm Springs, although times are starting to change as the old Vegas clientele die off and the late boomers rock and roll generation get older and start seeing big stage classic rock events in Vegas hotels as more appealing!
    2 points
  26. It always makes me wonder why people who profess to dismiss the Beatles and all their music will happily trawl through page after page of a thread merely to state their contempt. I have no time for many musical acts so I ignore any reference to them. Its much easier. There again modern music would be nothing like it is now without the fab four, so perhaps that rankles with some if they dont "get it".
    2 points
  27. Laurence Cottle and a million flautist probably could but the list of ready bass players is likely to be short.
    2 points
  28. Ours isn’t really a dog, more a random collection of reflexes with the ability to walk. It’s available expressions amount to one word plus punctuation “what?” Or “what !”
    2 points
  29. As mentioned elsewhere, I recently added a Nordstrand BigSplitMan 5 to my Maruszczyk Jake, I already had an NP5 in there (but actually swapped it out for the same thing but with custom narrow pole spacing, which the BigSplitMan has as well). The BigSplitMan is essentially two Nordstrand Big Split pickups (the Big Single done split coil for hum cancelling) somehow squashed into a humbucker sized package. I had to take a little bit of wood out of the bottom of the pickup cavity as it's quite a deep pickup. With the series / single / parallel switch fitted - there's not much point having this pickup without one IMO - you get two tones for the price of one at the bridge position. The bass is a Maruszczyk Jake 5A with Thomastik flats and a Delano preamp, recorded warts-and-all dry, Di through a Radial JDI and nothing else done, no compression no amp no cab. All you're really hearing are the strings, the pickup and of course the ebony fingerboard and whatever tonewood it is (Alder I think) . Recorded like that you also get the benefit of the pole piece height matching the fretboard radius, nice even volume across the strings. I slapped some drums on and noodled some keys just to give it some context, but left the bass up so it can be heard. First minute is "single", so half the humbucker which is the Big Single sound. Second minute is the full pickup in series, so a series humbucker made of two Big Singles (well, Big Splits in this case). So jumping between the first and second halves gives an alright comparison.
    2 points
  30. We only went ahead and recorded it ... Recorded with a Fender Aerodyne.
    2 points
  31. Just had another 3 Pinegrove straps delivered today, that makes 4 in total including my ACG branded one. After a fairly exhaustive search, these are the definitely the best straps out there in my humble opinion!
    2 points
  32. 2 points
  33. Not quite sure how Janek Gwizdala fits into this, seeing as he wasn't even born until 1978...
    2 points
  34. Thanks, guys, bless you.
    2 points
  35. That's gorgeous - i was in the lucky position to choose between a very similar rumour and a Merlin.. The Merlin got the nod, narrowly. I'm keeping this one and my Spitfire 5 until I give it all up (i.e. Never).
    2 points
  36. On the prog side, though known as a pick player, Chris Squire had a percussive technique where he'd hit the note a second time with the edge of his thumb. Not exactly funkaholic, but a sideline to the development.
    2 points
  37. 2 points
  38. Pipped to the post 🤣
    2 points
  39. Very good job, the intro sounded just like Slash and when the rest of the instruments come in it’s so near to the original. No disrespect to your singer, but that’s probably the only point you realise it’s not actually GnR playing.
    2 points
  40. Hippies were 60s - long gone by the mid-70s.
    2 points
  41. I'm giving up. Your comments are a nightmare to read and a total mess. Can't you write simple sentences with a subject, a verb and a complement alongside the correct punctuation ? If you have a message to pass, you have to learn the communication skills needed to do so, otherwise you'll loose all credibility. Synthesise your thoughts, read and understand other users comments, ... and think before writing : everyone will thank you.
    2 points
  42. @41Hz - ticks all your boxes I think?
    2 points
  43. Lots of heated opinions here! I started out using Cakewalk in the late 90s, before moving to Cubase, which I happily used in studios and at home for a long time. I'm now a Reaper user. I do more live engineering than studio these days, and my initial use case for Reaper was as a very stable, resource efficient and lightweight platform for capturing live multitracks at shows. It's a lot less bloated and hungry than other DAWs I've used, and proved to be a solid choice for the job. I've since moved over to use it for all my mixing and editing. The included plugin set (it's an optional tick box in the installer) is all useable - there's no fancy graphics on the front ends, it's all just sliders and parameter value displays, but they all sound fine and do the job they're meant to do, and there's a pretty broad selection of them. The audio editing and MIDI functionality all works fine for me. There's a little learning curve in adjusting if you're used to another DAW, but that's to be expected. You can load custom keyboard shortcut maps and I'm pretty sure there's one available that mirrors common Pro Tools shortcuts to help if you're moving across. It's not going to be for everyone, these things are always about what works for you personally, but it does the job fine for me and I've used it professionally for mixing and mastering of material that's gone out for releases and broadcasts. No desire to change, as it's doing everything I need it to and not causing me any issues.
    2 points
  44. The 01 still exists but it is not the same as the early ones which was all I was saying. Yes that was the plan for the top end of the highpass. The upper ring on the lowpass filters does the same as the push/pull on the Wal but again it is variable. I know the Wal preamp very well I played one for years. The 01 was my attempt to address what I thought could be improved from my perspective. There was also a bit of more is better and both myself and John are a bit prone to that so that lesson had to be learned. What I am also trying to get across is that filter preamps are not for everyone. You don’t need to have a filter preamp in one of my basses if you don’t want it so don’t let the filter preamp put you off my basses if you like the designs etc.
    2 points
  45. It certainly appeared with the Crusaders (Pops Popwell) before that late 70s era - they were very much jazz funk. Thinking back, and the mention of famous players and instructional videos, I saw the Brothers Johnson when they were part of Billy Preston's backing band in the early 70s - quite by accident - they supported the R Stones on a UK tour - I'm pretty sure LJ was using the style even then - Billy Preston and his band were superb in fact blew the decidedly average main act completely off - the only saving grace was the Stones' tight rythmn section and the presence of the wonderful Mick Taylor on guitar. The rest was pure s**te!!!
    2 points
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